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Seafood Village on Western, Kang Ho Dong's Offal BBQ

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Welcome to The K-Town Report, a regular feature that explores the culinary action-packed Koreatown scene. Restaurants here live and die by word of mouth. Here now, some of the latest openings and closures around town, with locations pinpointed by intersection.
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1) Olympic & Vermont: It wasn't long before the dumpling and noodle spot by spicy tofu pot specialist So Kong Dong morphed into Hong Kong Banjum a Korean-Chinese place originally inside the Koreatown Plaza and part of a mini-chain. The veritable styles of this unique fusion are well-displayed, with classic champoong and cha-jiang myun noodles, along with tang soo yook (sweet and sour pork or beef), and other cheap dishes. 2716-2726 W Olympic Blvd

2) Western & Olympic: Seafood Paradise has taken over the relatively short-lived Taenung Galbi. Previously Mu Dung San, one of the original all-you-can-eat barbecue establishments to gain popularity in the early 2000s, Seafood Paradise serves up Korean-style plates like raw fish laid out on platters, along with traditional seaside appointments (called hwae). 1040 S Western Ave

3) Wilshire & St. Andrews: Hong Dae Ip Gu took over the old Wang Dae Po (King BBQ) some time in late July. The premium barbecue here has carried over, with a bit more care and attention given especially to non-Koreans, which might be good for newbies of the genre. Named after a college-section of Seoul, it's meant to evoke a fun, sports-bar type vibe for young people. 3881 Wilshire Blvd

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[Photo: Ahgassi Gopchang]

4) Sixth & Harvard: Ahgassi Gopchang: Touted at nearby Kang Ho Dong Baekjong, the highly lauded premium barbecue spot, via whimsical cartoons, this intestines-centric 'cue literally means, "young lady pork intestines." The tubular intestines, which are a favorite among hardcore table-top BBQ aficionados, is on full display here. There's other types of intestines too, from makchang to the thicker, squid-like daechang that's getting easier to find at all-you-can-eat places. Consider this the evil offal-and-pork meat twin to the beef-centric Kang Ho Dong, but expect lengthy waits at both spots. 3744 W 6th St
·All Koreatown Coverage [~ELA~]

Hong Kong Banjum

833 S. Western Los Angeles, CA 90005

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