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One of LA's Last Truly Anonymous Food Critics Reveals Himself

The award-winning Patric Kuh of LA Magazine hides no more

Patric Kuh
Patric Kuh
David Stork

Los Angeles Magazine’s long-running food critic Patric Kuh has joined a growing rank of critics who have officially sloughed off their anonymity, penning a personal note for the magazine that details his desire to move the conversation about food and craft forward without worrying "whether someone will post my picture in a restaurant kitchen."

It’s a stark departure for the James Beard Award-winning Kuh from his years behind the veil of anonymity, but ultimately the decision seems have been reasoned out long ago. The final straw comes with the release of Kuh’s latest book Finding the Flavors We Lost, which prominently features the critic’s image on the jacket. The book, it should be noted, focuses on the artisans both locally (Nancy Silverton, for one) and nationally that have helped to reshape the way Americans think about food, particularly after the commodification of the mid-1900's food industry.

Kuh actually hasn’t been making much effort to conceal his likeness ever since he hit the road to drum up support for said book — he’s been holding public events and sending around a headshot for more than a month. That's not to say he's previously been the most hard to spot person in the room until now, either; here he is dining at Butchers & Barbers in Hollywood back in 2014.

Kuh joins LA Times food critic Jonathan Gold in the no-longer-anonymous camp. Gold had been at least paying lip service to the notion for years before officially doing away with the pretense nearly 18 months ago in a public display that graced the front page of the newspaper. Kuh's move now leaves only Besha Rodell as Los Angeles’ truly anonymous critic, though she's currently on a sabbatical as she works on her own book.

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