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APL chef Adam Perry Lang stands inside his meat locker, hands on hips.
Adam Perry Lang inside his dry-aging room
Wonho Frank Lee

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Inside Adam Perry Lang’s Hollywood Temple of Dry-Aged Beef

APL Restaurant hopes to open in LA this week

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Farley Elliott is the Senior Editor at Eater LA and the author of Los Angeles Street Food: A History From Tamaleros to Taco Trucks. He covers restaurants in every form, from breaking news to the culture, people, and history that surrounds LA's dining landscape.

It’s a funny thing, knowing that the man grilling the gigantic tomahawk chop back in the kitchen is the same man who made the steak knife. Or that the same man changed the dining room paint color a week before his restaurant’s doors opened, and that his old menu notes are used for wallpaper throughout the restrooms. But that’s exactly how Adam Perry Lang prefers things: Hands on, immersive, and casually impressive in a way that makes the outside observer wonder why everyone else doesn’t do things the same way.

Even the location of Lang’s new Hollywood house of meat APL Restaurant feels at once like an unknown and a certainty. The front door to the tall, spacious dining room opens out onto the Walk of Fame, around the corner from the Pantages Theater and in the long shadow of the iconic Capitol Records Building.

Hollywood and Vine has been many things over the years, but it hasn’t seen a standout culinary destination restaurant in quite some time. Lang isn’t worried — he’s got another 2,000 square feet of dry-aging beef sitting right below the sidewalk, bottles of wine to complement any kind of evening, and more than a few high-profile friends like Jimmy Kimmel rooting him on. Oh, and APL’s also in the barbecue hall of fame with plans to sell smoked meat sandwiches from a side window during the day.

APL
Fresh cuts
Wonho Frank Lee
APL
One of many steaks

Inside, the interior is a wrap of dark woods, fresh tile, marble, mirrors, and gold. The kitchen is not open in the way that every LA kitchen is right now, but there’s a little window peeking in on all the action should the appropriate seat offer a sightline. Otherwise expect leather booths, a bow truss’d back room with crystal chandelier lighting, and a dimly lit back bar for more casual dining. Designers Sami Hayek and Kathy Delgado worked alongside Lang to achieve the total look, which seats just under 150 people at a time.

In terms of food, APL is undeniably a steakhouse, albeit one with a Parisian feel and some Italian statement pieces. Expect Lodge Bread and French butter as a starter, with spaghetti bolognese and some seafood mixed into the middle of a meal for good measure. From there it’s all smoked short ribs and prime steaks, served with classic chophouse sides and a heavy pour of something appropriate by wine manager Evelyn Goreshnik or beverage director Jonathan Michael McClune. Marcus Lewis will be handling the barbecue side of things, as well as that sandwich retail area up at the front. The opening menus are below.

APL
A quiet moment

Adam Perry Lang’s long-awaited APL Restaurant hopes to open later this week, as early as Thursday, May 10, if inspections pass inside the Taft Building on Vine Street. Expect hours from 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. nightly, with lunch service Wednesday through Sunday from 11:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

APL Restaurant
1680 Vine St.
Los Angeles, CA

APL
The main laneway into the dining room
APL
Lots of booths
APL
Big tables for large groups
APL
Tall ceilings
APL
APL
APL

Bar details

APL
Glowing wine
APL
Cozy corners
APL
A peek into the kitchen
APL
Plenty of room
APL
The large semi-private back room
A dim evening restaurant with green walls and images of cattle.
Meat on view
APL
Handmade knives
APL
Even more decor items
APL
Handmade pasta
APL
Steak at the ready
APL
A well-kept back bar
APL
A full bar
APL
Established the day Adam Perry Lang was born
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