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46-Year-Old Pico Jewish Deli Label’s Table Has Quietly Closed For Good

Los Angeles has lost one of its older, more iconic Jewish delis

A stack of pastrami inside a sandwich with lots of mustard.
Pastrami from Label’s Table
Farley Elliott

Longtime Pico-Robertson Jewish deli Label’s Table has closed its doors after 46 years. The restaurant originally planned to stick it out through the end of January, but a note taped to the door today and signed by owner Bruce Krakoff says the restaurant is closed permanently due to a “family emergency.”

“We regret that we must now close forever,” the note continues. “We want to thank all of you for your continued support for 46 years. We will miss you. We love you.”

A note on the restaurant’s website previously said that the restaurant would remain open for “walk-in and pick up orders only” through January 31, but that no longer appears to be the case. The building occupied by Label’s Table is set to be demolished, and as of now the restaurant has no plans to relocate.

It’s been a tumultuous year or two for Jewish delis around Los Angeles. While the city is still home to many famous examples of the genre, including Langer’s in MacArthur Park and Brent’s in Northridge, others like Canter’s on Fairfax were struggling to continuously fill giant dining rooms even before the pandemic began. Beverly Hills legend Nate’n Al’s even closed for a time under new ownership, before reopening during the pandemic. The restaurant has since been hit with a COVID-19 outbreak, and is closed once again.

More recently, a new crop of Jewish-ish deli pop-ups and small restaurants, from the Ugly Drum pastrami brisket takeout on La Brea to Birdie G’s in Santa Monica to the rotating Bad Jew pop-up, have all stepped in to keep LA well-fed with brisket, latkes, matzo ball soup, and more.

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