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How the Huntington Beach Oil Spill Impacts Local Fishing Industry and Restaurants

Plus, Mélisse’s Josiah Citrin and a four-course meal by Little Fish, the Bad Jew, and Kae Whalen

US-ENVIRONMENT-POLLUTION-OIL Photo by PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

It’s still early to tell the full scope of the damage from Huntington Beach’s 17.7-mile oil spill from last weekend. Officials are saying that 146,000 gallons of oil have spilled into the Pacific, but it’ll take some time before it impacts Southern California’s fishing industry.

The Los Angeles Times published a report this week about the fishing grounds and aquafarms that source California markets and restaurants. The story also notes how the state Department of Fish and Wildlife placed a temporary ban on commercial and recreational fishing for the impacted 20-mile area, which goes from Sunset Beach south to San Clemente, and six miles westward. Diners may not realize that local waters supply everything from fish to lobsters to oysters, many of which end up on restaurant menus like at Slapfish, which says it sources 15 to 20 percent of its product locally. The oil spill — which Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a disaster — is now forcing fishermen and chefs to find new seafood sources as the cleanup continues.

Mélisse and Michelin

Want to know what it takes to regain two Michelin stars after losing them a decade ago? Find out by reading Robb Report, which spoke with Mélisse’s Josiah Citrin to outline the process.

Westside picks for Dine LA

If living in or venturing to the Westside for dining, the Santa Monica Mirror made it easy to pick a spot for Dine LA from participating restaurants like Akasha, FIN Asian Tapas, or Lunetta.

Local restaurant stars for Hispanic Heritage Month

Esaul and Gloria Martin are an LA success story. With four Fiesta Martin locations throughout South LA, the family recently opened Martin’s Cocina y Cantina, and ABC-7 has the story.

From executive to fry cook

Raising Cane’s — which has nearly 20 locations in Southern California — is dealing with a staffing shortage by repurposing office employees as fry cooks and cashiers and hire new employees, reports ABC-7. The company hopes to hire 10,000 new workers in the next 50 days.

Expanded hours at Wise Sons

Culver City’s Wise Sons expanded hours to dinner service this week. That means more hours to nab deli items from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, or weekends starting at 8 a.m. until 9 p.m.

A four-course “dinner at home”

Little Fish, the Bad Jew, and wine expert Kae Whalen partnered up for a four-course, family-style dinner in Echo Park this Friday. Entry price is $115 for a 6:30 p.m. or 9 p.m. seating. Get tickets here.

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