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4 Restaurants to Try This Weekend in Los Angeles

Your handy guide on where to eat from the editors at Eater LA

For a family-run shop with outstanding breakfast burritos: Village Mart & Deli.
For a family-run shop with outstanding breakfast burritos: Village Mart & Deli.
Mona Holmes

Every Friday our editors compile a trusty list of recommendations to answer the most pressing of questions: “Where should I eat?“ Here now are four places to check out this weekend in Los Angeles. And if you need some ideas on where to drink, check out our al fresco cocktails map for the latest.


January 14, 2022

For a Los Angeles brunch moment good enough to be on TV: Pann’s

For a Los Angeles brunch moment good enough to be on TV: Pann’s.
For a Los Angeles brunch moment good enough to be on TV: Pann’s.
Nicole Adlman

I started 2022 in the best way possible: eating fried chicken and waffles and buttery grits on the cozy outdoor patio at Pann’s, a coffee shop and restaurant that has been a stop on the way to or from LAX for many Angelenos since 1958. Although I’d seen the interior of the restaurant a couple times as the backdrop to Issa/Molly reunions in HBO’s Insecure, I’d never been myself — a problem that needed rectifying. What I learned: the food here is good, better than you might imagine for a spot known for its Googie architecture and proximity to an airport. The fried chicken comes to the table spitting hot, crispy, and fall-off-the-bone tender; a leg and a thigh weren’t enough, it turned out, because I ordered an additional plate of wings after eating them. The waffle is standard but comforting, a sweet complement to the chicken’s well-brined meat. Knocked down with some OJ and black coffee and the hum of airplanes in the sky, Pann’s was a perfect entry into January. 6710 La Tijera Boulevard, Los Angeles. —Nicole Adlman

For the warming reminder of rotisserie chicken: Byrdie’s Rotisserie

A table filled with cooked rotisserie chickens with blackened bits, pitched at a diagonal.
For the warming reminder of rotisserie chicken: Byrdie’s Rotisserie.
Suzanna Tran

For years Los Angeles has ebbed and flowed in its love of rotisserie chicken takeaway joints. There are the stalwarts, of course, the Pollo a la Brasas of the city, but plenty of others have tried to enter the market to only middling success. More recently Josiah Citrin has promised a rotisserie spot in Santa Monica soon, and the Kismet crew is humming along in Los Feliz with their ode to the turning bird — and now there is Byrdie’s, recently (re)opened on West Third Street. The Bacari team is behind this fast casual setup, with options for whole at-home birds, pulled chicken sandwiches, and all the quarters and legs and thighs in between. This is simple, warming, protein-rich food that can feel satisfying, healthy, and homey all at once. At its best rotisserie chicken like this can feed a neighborhood, but even if it just feeds commuters and tourists from its sunny space, that’s still very much a win. 8030 West 3rd Street, Los Angeles. —Farley Elliott

For a family-run shop with outstanding breakfast burritos: Village Mart & Deli

For a family-run shop with outstanding breakfast burritos: Village Mart & Deli.
For a family-run shop with outstanding breakfast burritos: Village Mart & Deli.
Mona Holmes

El Sereno’s charm really gets you. This windy East LA neighborhood is stacked full of hills and valleys, stretches of long roads, colorful buildings, and plenty of restaurant gems. A special one is the Village Mart & Deli — which sits directly across the street from the Forever 21 fulfillment center and a branch of LA Unified — a family-operated spot that spent the last three years perfecting casual and delicious food. If heading here for the first time, order the pastrami breakfast burrito, with its wonderful flavors stacked with avocados, eggs, pastrami, peppers, very crispy potatoes, and light cheese. The ceviche is on point, as are the soups and deli sandwiches, plus fridges full of Modelo and craft beer. The outdoor patio is covered and plenty of parking is always a welcome sight. Be sure to greet the Kobe Bryant mural on your way in. 2200 North Soto Street El, Sereno. —Mona Holmes

For a some of LA’s best Italian fare to-go: Angelini Osteria

It’s been over two decades since chef Gino Angelini opened his namesake osteria and it’s still one of LA’s best Italian restaurants, even with fierce competition in all corners of the city. Everything on the menu is carefully crafted, and Nonna Elvira’s green lasagna — made with a beef and veal ragù and scattered with fried baby spinach — is the dish to get. Also terrific is the housemade tagliolini in a creamy lemon sauce. Both the ambiance and cooking here stay true to its laidback osteria spirit, but given the COVID surge that we’re all trying to survive, the food makes for excellent lunch or dinner takeout. 7313 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles. —Cathy Chaplin


January 7, 2022

For a Downtown reboot with lots of flavor: Loam

A horizontal look at a sunny hotel dining room space with black chairs and tile.
For a Downtown reboot with lots of flavor: Loam
Ace Hotel

In recent years, hotel restaurants have moved in from their preexisting poles. It used to be that lobby-level dining went one of two ways: Majorly upscale, to ply the out-of-towners and give the property some shine, or casual-as-it-gets, from continental breakfast to grab-and-go basics. Nowadays both locals and discerning travelers demand something more, a cross between the casual nature of on-the-move morning eats and sit-down deliciousness.

Enter Loam, the Ace Hotel DTLA’s new restaurant, which opened last fall. The project relies on a fast-casual food model during the daytime, but soars at night with full service and a robust menu that offers LA musts like hamachi crudo and salads alongside an eyebrow-raising veggie burger (with patty made in-house) and hearty bucatini. Try the black cod with couscous, the mushroom risotto with smoked trumpet mushrooms, and always get the chickpea-battered cauliflower to snack on. Drinks are diverse but mellow, giving the whole scene a kind of evening cafe in New York sort of feel. Not that LA needs to feel like anywhere else, it’s just that at a hotel restaurant it’s always nice to get the sense of at least a bit of travel, even if only in the ambiance. 929 South Broadway, Downtown. —Farley Elliott

For very solid K-Town ramen that offers a nice heated patio: Iki Ramen

Ramen and rice bowl from Iki Ramen in Koreatown.
Ramen and rice bowl from Iki Ramen in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Koreatown’s ramen scene has had a few contenders over the years, but none has brought its A-game more than Iki, which is tucked into a busy strip mall next to a craft beer spot and boba shop. The spicy tonkotsu here sports real heat, the kind of spice that simmers and lingers and gets you after a few minutes instead of right away. The thin wheat noodles are almost too hard at first, but soften up after a little while, giving this bowl legit Hakata vibes. The modest portion with its dense, porky broth feels lifted right out of the southern Japanese city, too. The yuzu shio is excellent as well, sporting wavy alkaline noodles and a solid, citrus-tinted broth. The best part is Iki offers excellent outdoor dining with a handy lamp heater during these cold winter months. Something about this kind of ramen just tastes better when it’s cold outside. 740 S Western Avenue, #115, Los Angeles. —Matthew Kang

For a bounty of fresh local seafood in Ventura: Jolly Oyster

Grilled oysters and other seafood dishes from the Jolly Oyster.
For a bounty of fresh local seafood in Ventura: Jolly Oyster.
Nicole Adlman

After a lazy, rain-soaked, homebodyish holiday week in Venice, I was jolted into January by a specific craving: oysters. The only option, it seemed, was to drive up to Ventura to try the Jolly Oyster, an oyster and seafood truck set-up at San Buenaventura State Park (the seafood stand has a newer outpost in Culver City’s Citizen Public Market, but we felt like getting out of town to visit the original).

The open space — spotted with blue picnic tables and slanted umbrellas — features a shack for fresh seafood and oysters that visitors can shuck and prepare themselves, as well as a truck slinging made-to-order dishes. For us, the only way to do it was to try the entire menu: shelling out for fresh oysters (served with horseradish and fish sauce mignonettes), three types of grilled oysters, a bay scallop ceviche, a heaping uni tostada, crispy oyster tacos, and steamed Manila clams. The grilled oysters were the most decadent of the spread, from the “Creole” version flecked with sage and green onion to the creamy, white wine–soaked “Jolly style” and habanero butter renditions. The spot is BYO-anything, but in the spirit of some tentative resolutions, we washed it all down with blood orange soda before taking a walk on the beach. 911 San Pedro Street, Ventura. —Nicole Adlman

For solid standbys and that glorious fried chicken biscuit: All Day Baby

Interior dining room at All Day Baby.
Interior dining room at All Day Baby.
Wonho Frank Lee

It’s always a sight when approaching All Day Baby. The beige and red two-story building jumps out at you on this stretch of Silver Lake, where the menu has something you’re craving. During the daytime, the fried chicken biscuit sandwich, or the savory loco moco will satisfy. If heading in during the later hours, try the crayfish etouffee, steak and taters with housemade steak sauce, or queso fundido with smoked longaniza sausage, along with one of All Day Baby’s colorful cocktails. All Day Baby’s team is still a wonderful collaboration between Lien Ta, chef Jonathan Whitener and pastry director Thessa Diadem. It’s hard to believe All Day Baby opened in 2019, with such a prominent presence on the bustling corner of Sunset and Descanso Drive. Get there early on weekends, but the wait will always be worth it. 3200 Sunset Boulevard, Silver Lake. —Mona Holmes

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