clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

Filed under:

4 Restaurants to Try This Weekend in Los Angeles

Your handy guide on where to eat from the editors at Eater LA

Picanha from H&H Brazilian Steakhouse.
Picanha from H&H Brazilian Steakhouse.
Matthew Kang

Every Friday our editors compile a trusty list of recommendations to answer the most pressing of questions: “Where should I eat?“ Here now are four places to check out this weekend in Los Angeles. And if you need some ideas on where to drink, here’s our list of the hottest places to get cocktails in town.


February 3, 2023

For subs that sing and cannolis that rock: Eastside Italian Deli

The weather’s been looking up as of late following an unusually wet start to the year. With mild temps and sunny skies slated for the weekend, now’s the time to hit the trails, the beach, or the park. Grab a picnic blanket and head to Eastside Italian Deli in Los Feliz for food that was made for on-the-go eating. The classic cold cut sandwich comes piled high with four kinds of meat (salami, cappicolla, mortadella, ham) and provolone cheese. The “Italian hot mix” slathered on the bread brings a hum of heat. The house-made cannoli are an absolute must — its crisp shells piped with a just-sweet-enough ricotta filling, while cinnamon, powdered sugar, pistachios, and chocolate chips add the finishing touches. 1761 N. Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90027. —Cathy Chaplin

For Texas-style barbecue from an LA staple: Ray’s Texas Barbecue

Barbecue from Ray’s Halal Texas BBQ in Huntington Park.
Ray’s barbecue
Matthew Kang/Eater LA

One of LA’s finest barbecue joints started as a small pellet smoker into a bustling spot called Ray’s Texas BBQ. Texas-style barbecue fans have been loyal for years with lines maneuvering out the door. Though its founding chef Ray Ramirez died one year ago, his sons have since taken over operations. Not only is the brisket on point, but so is the burrito featuring some of that brisket, jalapeño cheddar sausage, and a layer of mac and cheese. Though takeout will help avoid the lines, it’s always best to enjoy each bite while piping hot on the cozy patio. 6038 Santa Fe Avenue, Huntington Park, CA 90255. —Mona Holmes

For seafood, sunshine, and proximity to the ocean: the Anchor Venice

The Anchor is a staple Venice restaurant, though it often gets less attention than some of the bigger names nearby. That’s okay; owner Kristin Ciccolella, an East Coaster with a can-do attitude and a hearty laugh, knows that it’s her regulars that have kept her in business all these years, and thanks to a large patio and quality seafood menu, she isn’t planning on going anywhere any time soon. There’s clam chowder and lobster bisque for those feeling the cozy, chilly vibes, and raw oysters, shrimp ceviche, and fried calamari for those trying to reclaim an early bit of sunshine and summer. The star of the show has to be the larger-than-life lobster roll, a behemoth of shellfish meat that is a relative steal at $28, at least compared to many others on the Westside. That’s just the kind of place that the Anchor is — few frills, no fuss, and big on flavor. Ciccolella wouldn’t want it any other way. 235 Main Street, Venice. —Farley Elliott

For a meat-laden feast with no end: H&H Brazilian Barbecue

Picanha from H&H Brazilian Steakhouse.
Picanha from H&H Brazilian Steakhouse.
Matthew Kang

Churrasco, or Brazilian barbecue, is one of my all-time favorite meals. My parents, who grew up in Brazil, instilled a deep love and appreciation for this unending feast of grilled meats and delicious sides. H&H Brazilian Steakhouse recently expanded to the Beverly Center in the former Farmhouse space, and so far the results are glorious. The pricing, at $69 a person for dinner, seems high but is only by a few dollars more than competitors Fogo de Chao and M Grill, and frankly, the meat quality is even better here. Juicy slices of picanha, ribeye steak, garlic beef, and even whole beef ribs are a delightful way to experience the full extent of churrasco. Though H&H used to claim its meats were grass-fed and organic whenever possible, the menu claims the salad bar is organic. The crisp collards, comforting feijoada, tangy vinaigrette, and crunchy farofa are executed to a high level, making H&H feel like the most impressive overall Brazilian barbecue in town right now. 8500 Beverly Boulevard #113, Los Angeles, CA 90048. —Matthew Kang


January 27, 2023

For comforting Thai cooking that hits the spicy spot: Miya

A selection of dishes from Miya in Altadena.
For comforting Thai cooking that hits the spicy spot: Miya.
Cathy Chaplin

The restaurateur behind the Sticky Rice mini-chain just opened a new spot nestled in the foothills of Altadena. Whether one lives in and around the area, or just loves checking out LA’s latest and greatest, Miya’s got a whole lot of flavors up its sleeves. The hand-scrawled, home-style menu, which is posted on the restaurant’s front door and available for takeout only, includes starters, noodles, and curries. Begin with an order of the tom yum soup; it dazzles and comforts in equal parts. The pad thai, savory and toothsome, is a far cry from the super-sweet glop that gets served around town. Also, save room for the curry of the day. Miya’s opening hours and service are limited for now, but it’ll be full-service with beer and wine in the coming months. 2470 Lake Avenue, Altadena, CA 91001. —Cathy Chaplin

For incredible gumbo and fried chicken in Venice: Willie Mae’s

Gumbo from Willie Mae’s in Venice.
Gumbo from Willie Mae’s in Venice.
Matthew Kang

I’ve been on the hunt for a great bowl of gumbo for a while now, and with Nola Cajun and Creole announcing a sad hiatus in Montebello, the next best option might be the crab and chicken-filled gumbo at Willie Mae’s in Venice, which occupies a sweet nook along Lincoln Boulevard. The iconic New Orleans restaurant has perfected fried chicken, with a shatteringly crisp crust and a deep, well-seasoned flavor in every bite. The gumbo, served with a small mound of white rice, feels more like a soup that a stew, but it satisfies with a heavy dose of Creole spices. The bowl is big enough to share, but next time, I’m getting my own. 324 Lincoln Boulevard, Venice, CA 90291 —Matthew Kang

For a bar menu and even bigger things to come: Button Mash

For a bar menu and even bigger things to come: Button Mash.
For a bar menu and even bigger things to come: Button Mash.
Wonho Frank Lee

Why not spend part of your weekend pressing buttons, toggling joysticks, and hip-bumping pinball machines? At Button Mash it’s very much about the video games, but don’t be fooled or a second into thinking that the beer and bites don’t matter. There’s a reason Button Mash’s owners have brought on Diego Argoti to drop a new restaurant concept Poltergeist next month; they believe that the space is as much (or more) a restaurant as it is a place to hang out and crush someone’s dreams at Mortal Kombat. For now, the arcade bar/restaurant/do-it-all space is running a tight but inviting bar menu by Argoti, which features a well-griddled burger with chile crisp on top, seasoned Parmesan fries, and the best bowl of housemade pasta butter noodles that one can get for $9. There are bigger things in the works for this space very, very soon, but for now just get over to enjoy the Korean-style fried cauliflower (which is vegan, by the way), some beers, and all the games there are to enjoy. 1391 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90026. —Farley Elliott

For cozy vibes and a Korean matzoh ball soup: Yangban Society

The weather says LA can expect more rain this weekend. It’s also downright chilly in the evening hours, which means that soup is likely the best remedy for whatever ails you. Though LA has deeply satisfying soup and stew options for days, get over to Yangban Society in the Arts District. Chef-owners Katianna and John Hong concocted a cool weather-winning dish with their matzoh ball soup using a Korean sujebi-inspired dumpling, schmaltz, and flavorful roasted chicken. It’s pure comfort in a bowl. If that doesn’t sound appealing, dig right into a hot congee pot pie with a hot cup of tea. 712 Santa Fe Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90021. —Mona Holmes


January 20, 2023

For a glittery night out with friends, steak, and tuna tartare: the Hideaway

For a glittery night out with friends, steak, and tuna tartare: the Hideaway.
For a glittery night out with friends, steak, and tuna tartare: the Hideaway.
Farley Elliott

It’s not that the new Beverly Hills restaurant the Hideaway is actually hiding, per se — it’s more that the semi-subterranean hotspot feels like a getaway. The dim evening room carries its own kind of permanent filter thanks to muted green and pink tones, lots of leafy corners, rustic garden-esque seating, and candles galore, all ideal for tucking into drinks and bites with friends or a date. The Rodeo Drive address is certainly an eye-opener (as are some of the prices) but that’s kind of the point: There’s neon signage here, sure, but the place isn’t pretending to be anything more than a come-as-you-are hangout for anyone who happens to show up. If you believe that you belong at the Hideaway, downing tuna tartare on little wonton crisps, or watching the chef carve a New York wagyu steak tableside, then you do. Bring a group, hang out in a corner, canoodle with someone special, and enjoy the ride. 421 N. Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, CA 90210. —Farley Elliott

For solid Vietnamese sandwiches outside the SGV: O Banh Mi

For solid Vietnamese sandwiches outside the SGV: O Banh Mi.
For solid Vietnamese sandwiches outside the SGV: O Banh Mi.
Cathy Chaplin

In a part of town that’s chock-full of well-branded restaurants — complete with cool logos and design-forward interiors — it was quite a trip to step into O Banh Mi in Los Feliz. With its name scrawled in permanent marker on the glass door and a barebones interior, the restaurant is putting its energy where it counts — and that is in the food. Swing by on Fridays for the popular banh mi stuffed with shredded roast pork and topped with an elongated shard of crispy skin. The sandwich is served alongside a container of rich pork jus. The classic banh mi dac biet filled with pickled vegetables and cold cuts is lovely too, with a creamy and rich pate that ties everything together. O Banh Mi is open seven days a week from noon to 3 p.m. 1997 Hyperion Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90027. —Cathy Chaplin

For a heated patio situation in Venice with tasty lobster pasta: Paloma

These chilly winter nights feel like the perfect reason to actually get out of the house and escape a little bit, and that’s exactly what Paloma in Venice provides. There might not be a more purely coastal European menu in Los Angeles, one that feels untethered to a specific cuisine and more rooted in a Mediterranean lifestyle. Think the second season of White Lotus without the treachery. Paloma’s expansive patio, the one closer to the building, offers some of the warmest heating in town, all the better to enjoy wide plates of sea bass carpaccio, citrus and fennel salad, and lobster spaghetti pasta featuring juicy chunks of the main ingredient. Overall the food here is well executed and predictable, with everything from hummus and meatballs to a terrific branzino grilled over an open wood flame. There are times when a dinner with friends might be aspirational, keeping to a cuisine or a menu concept, but other times everyone just wants something that feels familiar and comforting. Paloma fills that void with style, and plenty of warmth. 600 S. Venice Boulevard, Venice, CA 90291. —Matthew Kang

For perfect kebobs and dreamy hummus: Mini Kabob in Glendale

There’s a lot of reasons to love Mini Kabob. First, it’s a family-run affair by Armen Martirosyan and his parents Ovakim and Alvard, who always have friendly faces. Secondly, it’s in a cozy nook of Glendale with a picnic table out front. And finally, the food is some of the best Middle Eastern in the region. All menu choices are fantastic whether the chicken or beef kebobs, but the clear winner is the Matirosyan’s lule variety. The marinated ground beef is cooked over an open fire with results that are incredibly juicy and served over perfectly cooked rice with roasted tomatoes and jalapeno. Get an extra garlicky toum sauce because there never seems to be enough. Be mindful of ordering times, the spot closes by 6 p.m. and closed on Monday and Tuesday. 313 1/2 Vine Street, Glendale, CA, 91204. —Mona Holmes


January 13, 2023

For a seafood extravaganza in a cozy corner of Echo Park: Lonely Oyster

Salmon crudo at the Lonely Oyster in Echo Park.
For a seafood extravaganza in a cozy corner of Echo Park: Lonely Oyster.
Brooke Olsen

As an LA resident who enjoys minimal driving on weekends, trekking throughout Northeast LA for food is a joy. It starts by staking out those spots that friends raved about, or an effort from a familiar name in a corner of Echo Park. Lonely Oyster owner Don Andes — who owns the less-than-a-mile-away Little Joy Cocktails — recently brought on chef Dominique Crisp to prepare a menu that includes scallop carpaccio, grilled oysters, and a trio of lobster rolls for dinner. The chef offers wagyu and eggs, seafood Benedict, and smoked salmon tartine at brunch. It’s a safe and excellent bet to accompany any of the aforementioned with a bloody mary anytime from noon to 5 p.m., which is the perfect time to show up for weekend daytime dining. 1320 Echo Park Avenue, Echo Park, CA, 90026. —Mona Holmes

For fun sandwiches with serious size: Monroe Place

For fun sandwiches with serious size: Monroe Place.
For fun sandwiches with serious size: Monroe Place.
Farley Elliott

The greater Eater LA team has been a fan of Monroe Place, the small Culver City shop serving thick focaccia sandwiches, for quite some time. It’s easy to understand why: The menu is charming, owner Sara Fakhfouri is a personable and warming presence behind the counter, and the sandwiches themselves are stacked and action-packed. Hovering around $15, each sandwich is a meal-plus of quality ingredients and slight surprises like the spicy serrano-cilantro spread on the Serenity Now herbed turkey sandwich, or the dill and mint in the Greek yogurt-laced Dilly Dally chicken salad. There are options for vegetarians and vegans, jamon and manchego for the rest, and each sandwich can be made into a salad on the spot — though missing out on the Bub and Grandma’s focaccia feels like a shame. In truth, there’s no wrong way to enjoy Monroe Place. 8541 Washington Boulevard, Culver City, CA 90232. —Farley Elliott

For a fancy night out with Mexico City vibes: Damian

Hibiscus Meringue at Damian.
For a fancy night out with Mexico City vibes: Damian.
Damian

Just because the holidays and the new year are in our collective rearview doesn’t mean celebratory dining needs to come to a halt. For anyone seeking a fancier night out, head to Damian in the Arts District. The restaurant’s moody lighting, industrial touches, and pops of greenery transport diners to Mexico City for the evening. The bar seats are a sure bet if a last-minute table isn’t available. The tostada topped with fish and furikake makes for a solid start before diving into all things wrapped in warm, corn tortillas. The lobster with luscious pineapple butter is not to be missed, same goes with the chocolate mil hojas and hibiscus meringue for dessert. 2132 E. 7th Place, Los Angeles, CA 90021. —Cathy Chaplin

For a carb-loaded weekend lunch in Santa Monica: Milo & Olive

For a carb-loaded weekend lunch in Santa Monica: Milo & Olive.
For a carb-loaded weekend lunch in Santa Monica: Milo & Olive.
Matthew Kang

For some reason on a recent visit, a bunch of neighboring tables were wondering what that incredible aroma was wafting through our area. Oddly enough, a few people hadn’t even heard of the legendary garlic knot at Milo & Olive, a hulking spectacle of allium and dough. The starter is one of many carbohydrate selections at the Rustic Canyon sister restaurant in more inland Santa Monica, where blistered wood-fired pizzas topped with sausage and kale or suave bowls of carbonara reign. Don’t worry, the salads — from the chopped to the arugula and radicchio — work as fresh foils against the carb assault. Could Milo & Olive be one of LA’s most unsung neighborhood restaurants? I wish we had one on our block. 2723 Wilshire Boulevard, Santa Monica, CA 90403. —Matthew Kang


January 6, 2023

For a fiery start to the new year: Mr. T

A blow torch caramelizing a bowl of pasta and cheese.
For a fiery start to the new year: Mr. T
Cathy Chaplin

I managed to sneak in a stellar meal at Mr. T at the tail end of last year and haven’t stopped thinking about it since. For a fiery start to 2023, snag a seat at the winding bar or a more traditional dining room table stretching into a twinkle-lighted patio. Mr. T hums with a happy crowd that’s thrilled to be in good company and treated to a menu of familiar yet dynamic food by chef Alisa Vannah. Take the signature “mac n cheese” for example. The heap of rigatoni arrives under an aerated blanket of Comté cheese that’s blowtorched tableside. It’s the kind of earthy, rich, and satisfying dish everyone craves this time of year. Restaurateur Guillaume Guedj, who relocated from Paris to LA for the venture, is never far away, making sure that smiles abound and a good time is had by all. 953 N. Sycamore Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90038. —Cathy Chaplin

For a do-it-all destination in the heart of the city: Vicky’s All Day

Breakfast sandwich from Vicky’s All Day on a plate.
Breakfast sandwich from Vicky’s All Day.
Farley Elliott

The newest player in West Adams might seem a bit familiar at first. The CIM-backed restaurant Vicky’s All Day is just the latest place on West Adams Boulevard to have chef Danny Elmaleh at the helm (along with Mizlala and Johnny’s West Adams), though in practice the breakfast-to-dinner spot feels rather different than the others. This is a casual hangout for passers-by and the neighborhood at large, meant to serve as a brunch destination, a dinnertime meet-up joint, or a place for a stacked double patty lunch burger or fried chicken sandwiches. Elmaleh’s pan-Middle Eastern touches are still present in roasted cauliflower or a heaping Israeli sabich sandwich, but the menu also sports salads, pizzas, and lots of things roasted with flame. It’s nice to have a spot like Vicky’s All Day around, simply because it’s so handy for so many different people and occasions all at once. 5410 W. Adams Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90016. —Farley Elliott

For well-made French baked goods: Frenchifornia

When a colleague points her enthusiasm to a respected French-owned bakery, it’s bound to be a solid bet. Open since 2017, Frenchifornia imports flour from France to create traditional items like pain au chocolat, baguettes, macarons, palmiers, gateaus, and buttery madeleines. There’s really something for everyone, from chocolate muffins and a blackberry croissant to the spelt and quinoa croissant. If something a little heartier is required, opt for quiche, the smoked salmon eclair, or sandwiches with Comte cheese and ham, or simply build your own. The bakers here even venture into American sweets with chocolate chip cookies and a chocolate chip brownie. This is a full cafe that operates in daytime hours, so the coffee is strong with a choice of every kind of milk. In an annual practice, Frenchifornia also serves king cakes to celebrate the new year. 247 E. Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, CA, 91101. —Mona Holmes

For a hip, energetic steakhouse vibe in the South Bay: Boa Steakhouse

Wagyu ribeye from Boa Steakhouse in Manhattan Beach.
Wagyu ribeye from Boa Steakhouse in Manhattan Beach.
Matthew Kang

LA just isn’t the kind of steak town that Vegas or Chicago or New York can boast they are, but Boa Steakhouse has held a high standard of grilled beef for over 20 years in this city. With popular Santa Monica and West Hollywood locations, it made sense for the brand to start expanding to new areas, like a sleek semi-outdoor space in Manhattan Beach sharing the same building as sister restaurant Sushi Roku. Boa just oozes hip energy despite the slightly older crowd (though it’s still family-friendly, as there were tables with small children and even babies). Still, most people are on dates or celebrating special occasions, and nearly everyone is happy to be digging into well-made seafood and chops.

Garlicky, buttery scampi make for a solid start while the signature Caesar salad is tasty, though not as fun when not prepared tableside like it usually is (hopefully that changes in the coming months). Steak options cater to a wide audience, from filet mignon and even Australian wagyu ribeye to dry-aged cuts. I prefer the dry-aged stuff, seared to a very dark brown, but cooked evenly medium rare inside, which Boa can definitely accomplish. Australian wagyu is rich, fatty, and very tender, but lacks that extra funk. Previously the noteworthy steakhouse in Manhattan Beach was the Arthur J closer to the water, but Boa is a solid option more inland and with way more parking. 3110 N. Sepulveda Boulevard, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266. —Matthew Kang

Sign up for the newsletter Sign up for the Eater Los Angeles newsletter

The freshest news from the local food world