clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

14 Under-The-Radar Koreatown Restaurants to Try Now

View as Map

2008_10_hasmaps.jpgKoreatown has a multitude of excellent eateries, most of which can be found on this guide here. But there are some that serve regional specialties or rare dishes that literally can't be found anywhere else in America. The quality and breadth of Korean cooking in Los Angeles rivals even Seoul itself. Here now, a guide to under-the-radar restaurants in Koreatown that are worth trying now.


·All Koreatown Coverage [~ELA~]

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Dha Rae Oak

Copy Link

This restaurant doesn't have an easy descriptor, except that it has a variety of traditional dishes to go along with some specialty duck dishes of note. In particular, there's a table-top grill where smoked duck breast might be one of the most unique preparations around. And there's a whole roasted duck stuffed with glutinous rice and other aromatics, though it must be ordered four hours in advance. It's worth the wait.

Eighth Street Soondae

Copy Link

This soondae specialist does the Korean blood sausage right, with the classic sliced preparation that makes a great snack or good hangover cure. It can also be ordered in a large soup or stir-fry that's good for sharing.

DGM - Dwit Gol Mok

Copy Link

This bar looks straight out of Seoul, with a dingy interior that feels like a streetside pub. There bites are authentic, flavorful, and true to the motherland. Get the bossam or tofu kimchi and wash it down with Hite and soju.

The Prince

Copy Link

This midcentury dive has been converted to a dark drinking den where fried chicken rules the roost. Korean fried chicken, of course, with perfectly crackly skin and addictive pickled daikon cubes.

O Jang Dong Korean Restaurant

Copy Link

There aren't many places that specialize in naeng myun, cold Korean buckwheat noodles, but the ham hung or skate wing version here that's tossed in a sweet-spicy sauce is pretty amazing.

Myung In Dumplings

Copy Link

The massive wang, or king dumplings, were featured on Anthony Bourdain's The Layover, but that doesn't mean the other dumplings aren't worth ordering. The handmade specialties are still a treat.

Zzamong

Copy Link

Korean-Chinese fusion is a unique variant of the two cuisines that has certain special dishes, like cha chang myun, which are hand-pulled noodles tossed with a thick black sauce and ground pork. The version here is worth trying, in addition to the other staples of the fusion cuisine.[Photo: Table Conversation]

Keungama Korean Restaurant

Copy Link

An all-night diner, Keungama's suhl lung tang, or beef bone soup, has a bit of a lustier, more intense flavor than some of the other shops around the city, but it's hard to compete against the expansive interior and its near-crumbling room when it's 4 a.m.

Myeong Dong Donkatsu

Copy Link

Wako gets most of the attention when it comes to Korean-style tonkatsu, or pork cutlet, but the version at this Kobawoo-adjacent restaurant is pretty respectable, and very reasonably priced for lunch.

Feng Mao

Copy Link

The lamb and other skewers at this Chinese-style restaurant in Koreatown are a fun thing to share with a table of friends, washed down with ice cold Korean beer.

When you're sick or just need some pure comfort food, it's hard to beat the rice porridge and their terrific variety here. The pumpkin version is great, but the abalone juk is the reason to come in.

Ttu-Rak

Copy Link

The hefty cauldrons of jon gol are intense, but they make for a great shareable meal with friends and family. There's fried rice, classic stew pots like kimchi jigae, and plenty of other home-style preparations that aren't toned down in flavor.

Yanbian

Copy Link

This rather bizarre restaurant is no place for the neophyte Korean foodist, but there are some dishes here that can't be found anywhere. Named after the region between North Korea and China, this place mainly caters to immigrants. Try the stir-fried dried pollack or the "lamb stew."

Chugajip

Copy Link

This fried chicken specialist is a great place to take down a few pitchers of beer with spicy Korean wings and more. The rather authentic environs don't hurt the experience either.

Loading comments...

Dha Rae Oak

This restaurant doesn't have an easy descriptor, except that it has a variety of traditional dishes to go along with some specialty duck dishes of note. In particular, there's a table-top grill where smoked duck breast might be one of the most unique preparations around. And there's a whole roasted duck stuffed with glutinous rice and other aromatics, though it must be ordered four hours in advance. It's worth the wait.

Eighth Street Soondae

This soondae specialist does the Korean blood sausage right, with the classic sliced preparation that makes a great snack or good hangover cure. It can also be ordered in a large soup or stir-fry that's good for sharing.

DGM - Dwit Gol Mok

This bar looks straight out of Seoul, with a dingy interior that feels like a streetside pub. There bites are authentic, flavorful, and true to the motherland. Get the bossam or tofu kimchi and wash it down with Hite and soju.

The Prince

This midcentury dive has been converted to a dark drinking den where fried chicken rules the roost. Korean fried chicken, of course, with perfectly crackly skin and addictive pickled daikon cubes.

O Jang Dong Korean Restaurant

There aren't many places that specialize in naeng myun, cold Korean buckwheat noodles, but the ham hung or skate wing version here that's tossed in a sweet-spicy sauce is pretty amazing.

Myung In Dumplings

The massive wang, or king dumplings, were featured on Anthony Bourdain's The Layover, but that doesn't mean the other dumplings aren't worth ordering. The handmade specialties are still a treat.

Zzamong

Korean-Chinese fusion is a unique variant of the two cuisines that has certain special dishes, like cha chang myun, which are hand-pulled noodles tossed with a thick black sauce and ground pork. The version here is worth trying, in addition to the other staples of the fusion cuisine.[Photo: Table Conversation]

Keungama Korean Restaurant

An all-night diner, Keungama's suhl lung tang, or beef bone soup, has a bit of a lustier, more intense flavor than some of the other shops around the city, but it's hard to compete against the expansive interior and its near-crumbling room when it's 4 a.m.

Myeong Dong Donkatsu

Wako gets most of the attention when it comes to Korean-style tonkatsu, or pork cutlet, but the version at this Kobawoo-adjacent restaurant is pretty respectable, and very reasonably priced for lunch.

Feng Mao

The lamb and other skewers at this Chinese-style restaurant in Koreatown are a fun thing to share with a table of friends, washed down with ice cold Korean beer.

Bonjuk

When you're sick or just need some pure comfort food, it's hard to beat the rice porridge and their terrific variety here. The pumpkin version is great, but the abalone juk is the reason to come in.

Ttu-Rak

The hefty cauldrons of jon gol are intense, but they make for a great shareable meal with friends and family. There's fried rice, classic stew pots like kimchi jigae, and plenty of other home-style preparations that aren't toned down in flavor.

Yanbian

This rather bizarre restaurant is no place for the neophyte Korean foodist, but there are some dishes here that can't be found anywhere. Named after the region between North Korea and China, this place mainly caters to immigrants. Try the stir-fried dried pollack or the "lamb stew."

Chugajip

This fried chicken specialist is a great place to take down a few pitchers of beer with spicy Korean wings and more. The rather authentic environs don't hurt the experience either.

Related Maps