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A wooden counter with toro nigiri (thinly sliced tuna stop a pat of vinegar rice) at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach.
Toro nigiri at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach
Matthew Kang

Where to Eat Sushi Omakase for Under $80 in Los Angeles

High-quality fish at a reasonable price in LA

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Toro nigiri at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach
| Matthew Kang

LA is possibly the greatest sushi town in America, with everything from the rarefied high-end omakase to the the affordable conveyor belt kaiten variety. But right in the middle, somewhere below $100 per person after tax and tip (but before drinks), there’s a slew of affordable omakase places thanks to the great work of skilled chefs that want to make their craft more accessible. For the uninitiated, omakase is the Japanese word for “I’ll leave it to you.” That means leaving the meal, its order, progression, and ingredients, in the hands of the chef.

Oftentimes, the best sushi omakase deals come at lunch, such as the Michelin-starred Q in Downtown LA, which costs a pretty penny at dinner, but serves a 10-piece nigiri lunch for $75. Or even better, something like West LA’s celebrated Shunji, which costs around $200 a person for dinner, but just about $60 for lunch. Here now, where to eat sushi omakase for under $80 per person in LA.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Sugarfish

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Sugarfish has made its name from consistently high quality sushi despite multiple locations across Los Angeles (and beyond, such as New York City). Co-founder Kazunori Nozawa’s signature warm rice is the key element here, served beneath pristine cuts. The top-level “Don’t Think, Just Eat” version of the menu costs $52, and embodies Nozawa’s approach to omakase.

Sushi at Sugarfish Marina del Rey.
Sushi at Sugarfish
Matthew Kang

One of West LA’s more popular omakase locations, this rather utilitarian dining room hides on the second floor of a strip mall. Despite the lack of ambience, the sushi omakase is excellent, priced at a reasonable $50, and includes everything from blue crab hand rolls to toro. If the initial omakase portion isn’t enough, just keep ordering until full, though it’ll cost a bit more.

Shunji Japanese Cuisine

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Shunji is a quiet, upscale sushi restaurant in the evening with prices starting at $160 for dinner, but lunch time brings a relative bargain of about $55 to 60 for a medium-sized meal, which includes about 12 pieces of nigiri, soup, and a hand roll.

Hamasaku

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With a calming minimalist interior and a welcoming bar helmed by chef Yoya Takahashi, Hamasaku is a perennial favorite with industry types and business dinners, but the omakase remains a great value at $80. The meal includes 14 pieces of sushi, 6 pieces of sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and more. Be sure too book a seat at the bar when making reservations.

Hamasaku’s wood bar setup with plateware.
Sushi bar at Hamasaku
Wonho Frank Lee

Sawtelle Japantown’s popular sushi spots vary in range from the conveyor belt type to the high-end omakase. Right in the middle is Kiriko, a reasonably priced sushi restaurant with dinner omakase prices starting at $80, but lunch omakase ranges about half that depending on the day. Quality of the fish and rice are excellent despite the attainable price point.

Masakazu

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Newcomer Masakazu is a bit of a sleeper hit in West LA, with a quiet, unassuming location along busy Westwood Blvd. The 12-piece omakase runs about $80 a person but feels like a much more exclusive, luxurious experience with top-flight fish and stellar rice. Of course, there are more expensive options than the $80 omakase.

Sushi Note

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Kiminobu Saito’s dynamic sushi bar in Sherman Oaks serves some of the best omakase in the Valley, especially when paired with the restaurant’s excellent wine list. While the top omakase option costs $90, the middle edition called the “half note” is $60, and includes eight pieces of sushi, plus a hand roll and miso soup. During happy hour, the half note is just $50.

A glass of wine and sushi platter at Sherman Oaks’ Sushi Note
Sushi and a glass of wine at Sushi Note
Courtesy of Bread & Butter PR

Uzumaki

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Boasting some of the lowest-priced sushi omakase menus in LA, the highest tier at this affordable Culver City restaurant runs just $34, including eight pieces of nigiri and eight pieces of cut rolls with a ceviche starter. Nigiri cuts include blue fin, scallop, yellowtail, and salmon, so there’s a lot of value here.

Sushi Chitose

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One of the best bang-for-your-buck omakase experiences in LA, the tasting menu is only available at the bar at this Redondo Beach gem. Be sure to book in advance and pick between a $45 standard omakase and the $60 “premium” version. Spring for the premium one because the offerings are much better, from uni and toro tuna to unagi. The premium omakase comes out to about 17 or 18 courses and is available for both lunch and dinner.

A wooden counter with toro nigiri (thinly sliced tuna stop a pat of vinegar rice) at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach.
Toro nigiri at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach
Matthew Kang

Torrance’s beloved sushi destination has a very solid lunch sushi set of $38, which comes with eight nigiri pieces and a toro hand roll. Dinner highlights a $78 sushi set with 18 pieces plus two cut rolls, which might be enough for two people, or good for one very hungry person.

Sushi One

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Long celebrated as an affordable omakase destination in Koreatown, Tom Hitoshi puts together a custom sushi menu depending on what’s available by the season. Prices here range $65-70 per person with about ten courses of mostly raw fish.

Despite the high-priced (but very high-quality) nature of dining at Q, the lunch actually has a semi-reasonable omakase priced at $75 per person, including 10 pieces of nigiri, with the selections depending on what’s available in season. Chef Hiroyuki Naruke once had a two-Michelin sushi restaurant in Tokyo, bringing his talents to Downtown LA a few years ago. A great place to have a special business meeting if it’s on the expense account.

Soy-marinated tuna at Q, Downtown LA, on a gray plate.
Soy-marinated tuna at Q
Q [Official photo]

Pasadena’s unsung all-around Japanese restaurant was a favorite of the late critic Jonathan Gold. With everything from shabu-shabu to sushi, it’s got something for everyone. The omakase runs about $75 per person and comes with 12 pieces of nigiri. Lunch is a more affordable depending on the day, so be sure to check the menu.

Sushi Kimagure Ike

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This intimate sushi bar in Pasadena offers just 10 bar seats, allowed access to one of Pasadena’s most reasonably priced omakase experiences. The mid-range omakase runs $72 for 11 nigiri, with the highest priced at $85. Both offer a selection of sushi plus appetizers, but the higher tier includes grilled octopus and a seaweed salad.

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Sugarfish

Sushi at Sugarfish Marina del Rey.
Sushi at Sugarfish
Matthew Kang

Sugarfish has made its name from consistently high quality sushi despite multiple locations across Los Angeles (and beyond, such as New York City). Co-founder Kazunori Nozawa’s signature warm rice is the key element here, served beneath pristine cuts. The top-level “Don’t Think, Just Eat” version of the menu costs $52, and embodies Nozawa’s approach to omakase.

Sushi at Sugarfish Marina del Rey.
Sushi at Sugarfish
Matthew Kang

Echigo

One of West LA’s more popular omakase locations, this rather utilitarian dining room hides on the second floor of a strip mall. Despite the lack of ambience, the sushi omakase is excellent, priced at a reasonable $50, and includes everything from blue crab hand rolls to toro. If the initial omakase portion isn’t enough, just keep ordering until full, though it’ll cost a bit more.

Shunji Japanese Cuisine

Shunji is a quiet, upscale sushi restaurant in the evening with prices starting at $160 for dinner, but lunch time brings a relative bargain of about $55 to 60 for a medium-sized meal, which includes about 12 pieces of nigiri, soup, and a hand roll.

Hamasaku

Hamasaku’s wood bar setup with plateware.
Sushi bar at Hamasaku
Wonho Frank Lee

With a calming minimalist interior and a welcoming bar helmed by chef Yoya Takahashi, Hamasaku is a perennial favorite with industry types and business dinners, but the omakase remains a great value at $80. The meal includes 14 pieces of sushi, 6 pieces of sushi, chawanmushi, miso soup, and more. Be sure too book a seat at the bar when making reservations.

Hamasaku’s wood bar setup with plateware.
Sushi bar at Hamasaku
Wonho Frank Lee

Kiriko

Sawtelle Japantown’s popular sushi spots vary in range from the conveyor belt type to the high-end omakase. Right in the middle is Kiriko, a reasonably priced sushi restaurant with dinner omakase prices starting at $80, but lunch omakase ranges about half that depending on the day. Quality of the fish and rice are excellent despite the attainable price point.

Masakazu

Newcomer Masakazu is a bit of a sleeper hit in West LA, with a quiet, unassuming location along busy Westwood Blvd. The 12-piece omakase runs about $80 a person but feels like a much more exclusive, luxurious experience with top-flight fish and stellar rice. Of course, there are more expensive options than the $80 omakase.

Sushi Note

A glass of wine and sushi platter at Sherman Oaks’ Sushi Note
Sushi and a glass of wine at Sushi Note
Courtesy of Bread & Butter PR

Kiminobu Saito’s dynamic sushi bar in Sherman Oaks serves some of the best omakase in the Valley, especially when paired with the restaurant’s excellent wine list. While the top omakase option costs $90, the middle edition called the “half note” is $60, and includes eight pieces of sushi, plus a hand roll and miso soup. During happy hour, the half note is just $50.

A glass of wine and sushi platter at Sherman Oaks’ Sushi Note
Sushi and a glass of wine at Sushi Note
Courtesy of Bread & Butter PR

Uzumaki

Boasting some of the lowest-priced sushi omakase menus in LA, the highest tier at this affordable Culver City restaurant runs just $34, including eight pieces of nigiri and eight pieces of cut rolls with a ceviche starter. Nigiri cuts include blue fin, scallop, yellowtail, and salmon, so there’s a lot of value here.

Sushi Chitose

A wooden counter with toro nigiri (thinly sliced tuna stop a pat of vinegar rice) at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach.
Toro nigiri at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach
Matthew Kang

One of the best bang-for-your-buck omakase experiences in LA, the tasting menu is only available at the bar at this Redondo Beach gem. Be sure to book in advance and pick between a $45 standard omakase and the $60 “premium” version. Spring for the premium one because the offerings are much better, from uni and toro tuna to unagi. The premium omakase comes out to about 17 or 18 courses and is available for both lunch and dinner.

A wooden counter with toro nigiri (thinly sliced tuna stop a pat of vinegar rice) at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach.
Toro nigiri at Sushi Chitose in Redondo Beach
Matthew Kang

Nozomi

Torrance’s beloved sushi destination has a very solid lunch sushi set of $38, which comes with eight nigiri pieces and a toro hand roll. Dinner highlights a $78 sushi set with 18 pieces plus two cut rolls, which might be enough for two people, or good for one very hungry person.

Sushi One

Long celebrated as an affordable omakase destination in Koreatown, Tom Hitoshi puts together a custom sushi menu depending on what’s available by the season. Prices here range $65-70 per person with about ten courses of mostly raw fish.

Q

Soy-marinated tuna at Q, Downtown LA, on a gray plate.
Soy-marinated tuna at Q
Q [Official photo]

Despite the high-priced (but very high-quality) nature of dining at Q, the lunch actually has a semi-reasonable omakase priced at $75 per person, including 10 pieces of nigiri, with the selections depending on what’s available in season. Chef Hiroyuki Naruke once had a two-Michelin sushi restaurant in Tokyo, bringing his talents to Downtown LA a few years ago. A great place to have a special business meeting if it’s on the expense account.

Soy-marinated tuna at Q, Downtown LA, on a gray plate.
Soy-marinated tuna at Q
Q [Official photo]

Osawa

Pasadena’s unsung all-around Japanese restaurant was a favorite of the late critic Jonathan Gold. With everything from shabu-shabu to sushi, it’s got something for everyone. The omakase runs about $75 per person and comes with 12 pieces of nigiri. Lunch is a more affordable depending on the day, so be sure to check the menu.

Sushi Kimagure Ike

This intimate sushi bar in Pasadena offers just 10 bar seats, allowed access to one of Pasadena’s most reasonably priced omakase experiences. The mid-range omakase runs $72 for 11 nigiri, with the highest priced at $85. Both offer a selection of sushi plus appetizers, but the higher tier includes grilled octopus and a seaweed salad.

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