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Rice rolls at Huge Tree Pastry, San Gabriel Valley
Rice rolls at Huge Tree Pastry, San Gabriel Valley
Tony Chen

Five Stellar Chinese Breakfast Restaurants in SGV

Going beyond Taiwanese breakfasts.

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Rice rolls at Huge Tree Pastry, San Gabriel Valley
| Tony Chen

Taiwanese-style breakfast options have been available in the San Gabriel Valley since before Hong Kong realtor Frederic Hsieh named Monterey Park the "Chinese Beverly Hills" in 1977. It's a staple of the area to this day, and the constant waves of Chinese immigrants means the breakfast options remain as diverse as ever. Here are five of the best options to carry on the Chinese breakfast tradition in the SGV, starting as early as 7 a.m.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Delicious Food Corner

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This Hong Kong breakfast joint has been serving da pai dong style food since 2008. After doubling its seating in 2014, the lines have become more manageable, but you'd do well to still expect a wait. Don't forget to snag some luxurious (and spicy) house made XO sauce on the way out.

Fortune No.1 金海餐厅

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The Liu sisters and their team of Tianjin compatriots cook up a la minute Northern-style Chinese dumplings and buns with myriad fillings for lunch, but their greatest treasure may be breakfast. Fortune No. 1 opens early and offers giant, beautifully-folded eggy crepes stuffed with crullers. The guozi (folded crepe) is the best in LA.

Huge Tree Pastry

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This longtime Taiwanese deli is still going strong 30 years later, albeit under a new name. The Liu family brought Taiwanese pastry recipes from its motherland, and churns out provincial items known all over the island of Formosa. Try the egg-filled pancake, the savory purple sticky rice roll, the salty soy milk, and the daikon cake with eggs.

JJ Bakery & Cafe

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JJ Bakery, which recently also opened JJ2 in Ktown, opened its latest and greatest bakery-turned-cafe only last December. On one side is a full service restaurant that starts serving 30-plus items of stereotypical Taiwanese breakfast, while the other end forks over Franco-Taiwanese style pastries. Yes, you can have both at the same time.

Noodle Cafe

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Generations of Chinese have been raised on this cafe's noodle soups, and some of the earliest U.S. Chinese immigrants can still be found here on weekday mornings, slurping away bowls of simple noodles at extremely low prices. Pro tip: park on the street and avoid the lot at all cost, and always, always add pork kidney, no matter what style of noodles you're after.

Delicious Food Corner

This Hong Kong breakfast joint has been serving da pai dong style food since 2008. After doubling its seating in 2014, the lines have become more manageable, but you'd do well to still expect a wait. Don't forget to snag some luxurious (and spicy) house made XO sauce on the way out.

Fortune No.1 金海餐厅

The Liu sisters and their team of Tianjin compatriots cook up a la minute Northern-style Chinese dumplings and buns with myriad fillings for lunch, but their greatest treasure may be breakfast. Fortune No. 1 opens early and offers giant, beautifully-folded eggy crepes stuffed with crullers. The guozi (folded crepe) is the best in LA.

Huge Tree Pastry

This longtime Taiwanese deli is still going strong 30 years later, albeit under a new name. The Liu family brought Taiwanese pastry recipes from its motherland, and churns out provincial items known all over the island of Formosa. Try the egg-filled pancake, the savory purple sticky rice roll, the salty soy milk, and the daikon cake with eggs.

JJ Bakery & Cafe

JJ Bakery, which recently also opened JJ2 in Ktown, opened its latest and greatest bakery-turned-cafe only last December. On one side is a full service restaurant that starts serving 30-plus items of stereotypical Taiwanese breakfast, while the other end forks over Franco-Taiwanese style pastries. Yes, you can have both at the same time.

Noodle Cafe

Generations of Chinese have been raised on this cafe's noodle soups, and some of the earliest U.S. Chinese immigrants can still be found here on weekday mornings, slurping away bowls of simple noodles at extremely low prices. Pro tip: park on the street and avoid the lot at all cost, and always, always add pork kidney, no matter what style of noodles you're after.

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