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An array of Indian dishes and naan with rice.
Indian dishes from Arth Bar in Culver City.
Matthew Kang

The 14 Essential Restaurants in Culver City

Honey butter-drenched corn bread, the best fried chicken in LA, and more

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Indian dishes from Arth Bar in Culver City.
| Matthew Kang

Culver City has always been better known for its famous movie studios including Sony Pictures Studios and Culver Studios (where films have been made since 1912 including King Kong, Gone With the Wind, and The Wizard of Oz) than its culinary scene. However, the city’s food offerings have grown by leaps and bounds in recent years, welcoming newcomers like swanky bistro Juliet and Peruvian spot Ceviche Stop, while beloved legends like Mayura and Father’s Office continue to nourish the community. Here now are the 14 essential restaurants in Culver City.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Ceviche Stop

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For Peruvian food in Culver City, look no further than Ceviche Stop. Find dishes from chef Walther Adrianzen that draw on traditional Peruvian flavors and techniques like lomo saltado and classic ceviche, plus more new-school interpretations like lobster nachos. Order the hangover ceviche, served with tiger’s milk and calamari, as well as the pescado frito which comes with a whole fried red snapper. — Rebecca Roland, associate editor

A plate of colorful Peruvian ceviche.
Mixto ceviche from Ceviche Stop in Culver City.
Matthew Kang

Monroe Place

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It’s not easy to find a truly standout sandwich spot, but Monroe Place manages to pull it off with top-notch bread and thoughtful filling combinations, like the pear-gorgonzola, tuna salad on ciabatta, and the Italian Spainard that fuses jamon serrano with mortadella and soppressata for a fresh take on the Italian deli sandwich. Order ahead online to avoid any waits during lunch. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

For fun sandwiches with serious size: Monroe Place.
Sandwich from Monroe Place in Culver City.
Farley Elliott

Father's Office

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Sang Yoon’s enduring gastropub is known for its fantastic burger, which uses dry-aged beef, arugula, Maytag blue cheese, and caramelized onion for something recalling French onion soup. But the menu offers compelling options beyond the burger, including daily specials like seasonal fried softshell crab and Spanish tapas-inspired dishes. Father’s Office remains one of the most reliable, flavor-packed places to enjoy hearty food and solid drinks (especially the craft beer selection), but the experience comes with some rules. First, it’s a true bar, so it’s 21 and over only, and second, they don’t serve ketchup. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

A pub burger with arugulua and melty cheese.
Burther from Father’s Office.
Elizabeth Daniels

It’s hard to think of a more romantic restaurant than the candle-lit dining room at Juliet where the food, wine, and vibe lean fabulously French. The restaurant comes from Rohan Talwar and the team behind Norah and Margot. While the endive salad with pungent Roquefort and the chicken liver tartlet make for outstanding starters, the seasonal risotto and cigars filled with duck confit are hefty enough to stand in for mains. Take a look at the deep wine list curated by Geno Tomko of Lucid Wines that is available by the ounce, half glass, full glass, or carafe. — Cathy Chaplin, senior editor

Four light golden madeleines on a white plate with flourishes of napkin for elegant effect.
Madeleines from Juliet in Culver City.
Liz Barclay

Citizen Public Market

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There are many ways to explore Citizen Public Market, one of LA’s best food halls. Swing in during morning hours for a coffee at Goodboybob before settling in for remote work in the market’s many nooks and quiet corners. Or better yet, snag a seat for lunch at Uoichiba for a flight of hand rolls made with dry-aged fish or Shaanxi-style noodles at Bang Bang Noodles. The post-work crowd will do well with fried chicken wings from Go Go Bird and a strong drink at Bar Bohemian located on the welcoming rooftop. — Cathy Chaplin, senior editor

Citizen Public Market’s outdoor dining area
Outdoor dining area of Citizen Public Market in Culver City.
Wonho Frank Lee

Arth Bar & Kitchen

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This newish player in the Downtown Culver City scene puts out innovative but not too unfamiliar Indian food with a keen sense of presentation. Consider the avocado bhel, built carefully into a mound and blessed with all the crispy, satisfying textures of this starter. The butter chicken and fish moilee are stellar entrees, paired with fluffy basmati rice and garlicky naan. Arth Bar displays a satisfying balance between upscale Indian that still plays the hits. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

An array of colorful new-school Indian dishes.
Fusion Indian dishes from Culver City’s Indian restaurant Arth.
Arth Bar + Kitchen

Honey's Kettle Fried Chicken

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Vincent Williams, or chef Vinny, has mastered the art of fried chicken at his bustling Culver City restaurant. Sporting shatteringly crisp skin with extreme consistency, these juicy birds could be the finest fried chicken in Southern California. Drop-style biscuits and packets of honey are served on the side. Honey’s Kettle has found a wider audience thanks to cloud kitchens and delivery across the city. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Fried chicken under a warmer.
Fried chicken on the rack at Honey’s Kettle.
Matthew Kang

Mayura Indian Restaurant

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Long a favorite of the late restaurant critic Jonathan Gold, this strip mall gem features cuisine from Kerala, India, which melds a thousand years of influence from its numerous trading partners. The menu features towering masala dosas, pitch-perfect chutneys, and fluffy biriyani plates. Bring a group to share the Southern Indian feast. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Mayura Indian Restaurant in Culver City, California.
Dosa from Mayura in Culver City.
Cathy Chaplin

Copenhagen Pastry

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Founder Karen Hansen wanted to serve a beautiful, buttery slice of her homeland Denmark at this lovely 11-year-old bakery. Serving delightful Danishes, cakes, and other baked treats that balance all the right levels of sugar, fruit, and pastry, Copenhagen works great as a morning pick-me-up or as a shareable office treat. The princess cake, borrowed from nearby Sweden, is a must-order for cake aficionados. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Danishes on a tray at an LA bakery.
Raspberry danishes at Copenhagen Bakery.
Wonho Frank Lee

Tito's Tacos

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Opinions split over whether Tito’s Tacos is worth the wait, but the lines and celebrity following speak to one thing: the crispy old-school tacos are worth trying at least once. Filled with shredded beef and overflowing with electric orange shredded cheese, these are fun and satisfying, especially with the fresh tortilla chips and house salsa. Try the beef, bean, and cheese burrito for something to truly write home about. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Tito’s Tacos, Thursday at 6 p.m.
Tito’s Tacos.
Wonho Frank Lee

Dear John's

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It’s hard to say exactly when Dear John’s will serve its final ice-cold martini and oysters Rockefeller so it’s best to visit this classic dining room as often as possible until then. Seasoned chefs Hans Röckenwagner and Josiah Citrin teamed up to re-open the Rat Pack-era restaurant in 2019 and continue to turn out memorable takes on American steakhouse classics like shrimp cocktail, chicken Parmesan, and beef cuts of all stripes. — Cathy Chaplin, senior editor

A dark, clubby lounge with red walls and artwork.
The dimly-lit dining room of Dear John’s in Culver City.
Wonho Frank Lee

Lodge Bread Co

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Open since 2015, Lodge Bread is an enduring Los Angeles bakery that is still making terrific bread alongside pastries, and other breakfast and lunch items. Expect a full array of naturally leavened sourdough loaves, plus the famous oversized cinnamon roll, and more. Also on the menu, find the fantastic (and vegan) fat pita, a breakfast sandwich, and a few different pizzas. Lodge Bread also has two other locations across Los Angeles in Woodland Hills and Pico-Robertson. — Rebecca Roland, associated editor

Loaves of dark brown crusted sourdough bread.
Country loaves from Lodge Bread.
Wonho Frank Lee

Hatchet Hall

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With an expansive outdoor patio, charming indoor dining room, and a Southern-inflected menu, Hatchet Hall remains a solid Westside dining option for dinner and brunch. The restaurant, owned by Louie and Netty Ryan, has seen several chefs come and go throughout its nearly decade-long run including Brian Dunsmoor and Wes Whitsell but the menu continues to deliver with crowd-pleasing hits like the cast iron cornbread, loaded baked potato gnocchi, and rabbit schnitzel. — Cathy Chaplin, senior editor

Hatchet Hall in Culver City.
Hatchet Hall in Culver City.
Ashley Randall Photography

EK Valley

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Tiny mom-and-mom Oaxacan restaurant EK Valley serves humble but satisfying food laced with smooth mole. Fan favorites like chicken or steak fajitas will be better than expected while shareable, sizzling molcajetes of cecina, tasajo, and chorizo provide a meaty feast. The mole-covered burrito, a bit of a unique invention by chef Epifanio Garcia, recalls the wet burritos of East LA and beyond but with Oaxaca’s finest sauce. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Colorful decor inside a Oaxacan restaurant.
Inside EK valley in Culver City.
Matthew Kang

Ceviche Stop

For Peruvian food in Culver City, look no further than Ceviche Stop. Find dishes from chef Walther Adrianzen that draw on traditional Peruvian flavors and techniques like lomo saltado and classic ceviche, plus more new-school interpretations like lobster nachos. Order the hangover ceviche, served with tiger’s milk and calamari, as well as the pescado frito which comes with a whole fried red snapper. — Rebecca Roland, associate editor

A plate of colorful Peruvian ceviche.
Mixto ceviche from Ceviche Stop in Culver City.
Matthew Kang

Monroe Place

It’s not easy to find a truly standout sandwich spot, but Monroe Place manages to pull it off with top-notch bread and thoughtful filling combinations, like the pear-gorgonzola, tuna salad on ciabatta, and the Italian Spainard that fuses jamon serrano with mortadella and soppressata for a fresh take on the Italian deli sandwich. Order ahead online to avoid any waits during lunch. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

For fun sandwiches with serious size: Monroe Place.
Sandwich from Monroe Place in Culver City.
Farley Elliott

Father's Office

Sang Yoon’s enduring gastropub is known for its fantastic burger, which uses dry-aged beef, arugula, Maytag blue cheese, and caramelized onion for something recalling French onion soup. But the menu offers compelling options beyond the burger, including daily specials like seasonal fried softshell crab and Spanish tapas-inspired dishes. Father’s Office remains one of the most reliable, flavor-packed places to enjoy hearty food and solid drinks (especially the craft beer selection), but the experience comes with some rules. First, it’s a true bar, so it’s 21 and over only, and second, they don’t serve ketchup. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

A pub burger with arugulua and melty cheese.
Burther from Father’s Office.
Elizabeth Daniels

Juliet

It’s hard to think of a more romantic restaurant than the candle-lit dining room at Juliet where the food, wine, and vibe lean fabulously French. The restaurant comes from Rohan Talwar and the team behind Norah and Margot. While the endive salad with pungent Roquefort and the chicken liver tartlet make for outstanding starters, the seasonal risotto and cigars filled with duck confit are hefty enough to stand in for mains. Take a look at the deep wine list curated by Geno Tomko of Lucid Wines that is available by the ounce, half glass, full glass, or carafe. — Cathy Chaplin, senior editor

Four light golden madeleines on a white plate with flourishes of napkin for elegant effect.
Madeleines from Juliet in Culver City.
Liz Barclay

Citizen Public Market

There are many ways to explore Citizen Public Market, one of LA’s best food halls. Swing in during morning hours for a coffee at Goodboybob before settling in for remote work in the market’s many nooks and quiet corners. Or better yet, snag a seat for lunch at Uoichiba for a flight of hand rolls made with dry-aged fish or Shaanxi-style noodles at Bang Bang Noodles. The post-work crowd will do well with fried chicken wings from Go Go Bird and a strong drink at Bar Bohemian located on the welcoming rooftop. — Cathy Chaplin, senior editor

Citizen Public Market’s outdoor dining area
Outdoor dining area of Citizen Public Market in Culver City.
Wonho Frank Lee

Arth Bar & Kitchen

This newish player in the Downtown Culver City scene puts out innovative but not too unfamiliar Indian food with a keen sense of presentation. Consider the avocado bhel, built carefully into a mound and blessed with all the crispy, satisfying textures of this starter. The butter chicken and fish moilee are stellar entrees, paired with fluffy basmati rice and garlicky naan. Arth Bar displays a satisfying balance between upscale Indian that still plays the hits. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

An array of colorful new-school Indian dishes.
Fusion Indian dishes from Culver City’s Indian restaurant Arth.
Arth Bar + Kitchen

Honey's Kettle Fried Chicken

Vincent Williams, or chef Vinny, has mastered the art of fried chicken at his bustling Culver City restaurant. Sporting shatteringly crisp skin with extreme consistency, these juicy birds could be the finest fried chicken in Southern California. Drop-style biscuits and packets of honey are served on the side. Honey’s Kettle has found a wider audience thanks to cloud kitchens and delivery across the city. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Fried chicken under a warmer.
Fried chicken on the rack at Honey’s Kettle.
Matthew Kang

Mayura Indian Restaurant

Long a favorite of the late restaurant critic Jonathan Gold, this strip mall gem features cuisine from Kerala, India, which melds a thousand years of influence from its numerous trading partners. The menu features towering masala dosas, pitch-perfect chutneys, and fluffy biriyani plates. Bring a group to share the Southern Indian feast. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Mayura Indian Restaurant in Culver City, California.
Dosa from Mayura in Culver City.
Cathy Chaplin

Copenhagen Pastry

Founder Karen Hansen wanted to serve a beautiful, buttery slice of her homeland Denmark at this lovely 11-year-old bakery. Serving delightful Danishes, cakes, and other baked treats that balance all the right levels of sugar, fruit, and pastry, Copenhagen works great as a morning pick-me-up or as a shareable office treat. The princess cake, borrowed from nearby Sweden, is a must-order for cake aficionados. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Danishes on a tray at an LA bakery.
Raspberry danishes at Copenhagen Bakery.
Wonho Frank Lee

Tito's Tacos

Opinions split over whether Tito’s Tacos is worth the wait, but the lines and celebrity following speak to one thing: the crispy old-school tacos are worth trying at least once. Filled with shredded beef and overflowing with electric orange shredded cheese, these are fun and satisfying, especially with the fresh tortilla chips and house salsa. Try the beef, bean, and cheese burrito for something to truly write home about. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Tito’s Tacos, Thursday at 6 p.m.
Tito’s Tacos.
Wonho Frank Lee

Dear John's

It’s hard to say exactly when Dear John’s will serve its final ice-cold martini and oysters Rockefeller so it’s best to visit this classic dining room as often as possible until then. Seasoned chefs Hans Röckenwagner and Josiah Citrin teamed up to re-open the Rat Pack-era restaurant in 2019 and continue to turn out memorable takes on American steakhouse classics like shrimp cocktail, chicken Parmesan, and beef cuts of all stripes. — Cathy Chaplin, senior editor

A dark, clubby lounge with red walls and artwork.
The dimly-lit dining room of Dear John’s in Culver City.
Wonho Frank Lee

Lodge Bread Co

Open since 2015, Lodge Bread is an enduring Los Angeles bakery that is still making terrific bread alongside pastries, and other breakfast and lunch items. Expect a full array of naturally leavened sourdough loaves, plus the famous oversized cinnamon roll, and more. Also on the menu, find the fantastic (and vegan) fat pita, a breakfast sandwich, and a few different pizzas. Lodge Bread also has two other locations across Los Angeles in Woodland Hills and Pico-Robertson. — Rebecca Roland, associated editor

Loaves of dark brown crusted sourdough bread.
Country loaves from Lodge Bread.
Wonho Frank Lee

Hatchet Hall

With an expansive outdoor patio, charming indoor dining room, and a Southern-inflected menu, Hatchet Hall remains a solid Westside dining option for dinner and brunch. The restaurant, owned by Louie and Netty Ryan, has seen several chefs come and go throughout its nearly decade-long run including Brian Dunsmoor and Wes Whitsell but the menu continues to deliver with crowd-pleasing hits like the cast iron cornbread, loaded baked potato gnocchi, and rabbit schnitzel. — Cathy Chaplin, senior editor

Hatchet Hall in Culver City.
Hatchet Hall in Culver City.
Ashley Randall Photography

EK Valley

Tiny mom-and-mom Oaxacan restaurant EK Valley serves humble but satisfying food laced with smooth mole. Fan favorites like chicken or steak fajitas will be better than expected while shareable, sizzling molcajetes of cecina, tasajo, and chorizo provide a meaty feast. The mole-covered burrito, a bit of a unique invention by chef Epifanio Garcia, recalls the wet burritos of East LA and beyond but with Oaxaca’s finest sauce. — Matthew Kang, lead editor

Colorful decor inside a Oaxacan restaurant.
Inside EK valley in Culver City.
Matthew Kang

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