clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Beef brisket cooking on a tabletop grill with chopped kimchi and spicy bean sprouts at Pigya in Koreatown.
Beef brisket cooking on a tabletop grill with chopped kimchi and spicy bean sprouts at Pigya in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

The 18 Finest Korean Barbecue Restaurants in Los Angeles

A celebration of meat, smoke, and soju in the country’s best KBBQ scene

View as Map
Beef brisket cooking on a tabletop grill with chopped kimchi and spicy bean sprouts at Pigya in Koreatown.
| Matthew Kang

Korean barbecue has become an integral part of Southern California’s culinary and cultural fabric. There's something appealingly primal about the experience — grilling rosy-red slabs of impossibly well-marbled beef atop hissing coals. Add to that the beer- and soju-fueled conviviality that’s characteristic of the cuisine, and it's easy to see why Korean barbecue has become an enduring part of dining in LA. Here now are 18 of the finest KBBQ spots around town, from high-end premium restaurants to everyday all-you-can-eat extravaganzas.

Read More
Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

ABSteak by Chef Akira Back

Copy Link

When Akira Back, who has multiple restaurants in Asia and Las Vegas, opened a steakhouse in LA, the original idea was to do a sort of Korean fusion with a focus on grilled beef. Now it’s an unabashed high-end Korean barbecue, with banchan and requisite side dishes that give it a complete Koreatown-style experience, only more west. At the moment, there might not be a more impressive place for Korean barbecue, from the sleek ambience to the helpful service.

Cuts of beef at ABSteak ready to be grilled.
Steaks ready for the grill at AB Steak.
ABSteak Los Angeles

Ten-Raku

Copy Link

One of the older, more established premium Korean barbecue spots, this focused restaurant has fantastic lunch specials and versatile dinner combinations that won’t break the bank. The mostly Korean crowd considers this one of the most reliable restaurants in town. Ten-raku also has a new AYCE spot in Lynwood.

Banchan and more from Tenraku, Koreatown.
Banchan and more from Tenraku.
Matthew Kang

Yerim Korean BBQ

Copy Link

All-you-can-eat Korean barbecue is a staple of the genre, but few execute the concept as well as Yerim, which offers very good sub-$40 menus with a wide array of high-quality meats like marinated short rib, beef tongue, and intestines. After a few drinks, tax, and tip, expect to pay $60 a person, which is a solid deal these days.

Yerim Korean Barbecue meats.
Yerim Korean Barbecue meats.
Matthew Kang

Prime K BBQ

Copy Link

This dimly lit but sleek restaurant tucked into a weirdly laid out commercial property feels almost hidden along a busy stretch of Western Avenue. But inside, find heaping plates of very high-end beef sliced and grilled for you at the table. The smallest combination comes in at around $140 and feeds two to three people easily. There’s nothing otherwise remarkable here except great meat and straightforward service, and the dining room full of mostly Korean-only speakers proves the community likes Prime’s simplicity.

High-grade beef from Prime K BBQ in Los Angeles on a large platter.
High-grade beef from Prime K BBQ in Los Angeles.
Matthew Kang

Hanu K BBQ

Copy Link

Hanu’s trick might be the banchan robots roaming the space, but the restaurant placed on the ground floor of one of LA’s larger spas serves some of the neighborhood’s best Korean barbecue menus. The smallest combination feeds potentially four people, and comes with an impressive array of jun, or fried vegetables and fish filets, and even galbijjim as a part of the package. The included galbijjim isn’t world-beating, but it’s nice to have on the table. Servers grill better-than-average meat (don’t expect Park’s or Chosun-level) but the whole table filled with dozens of different bites is what makes Hanu a fun meal.

Dishes and meat with the grill front and center at Hanu K BBQ in Los Angeles.
Dishes and meat with the grill front and center at Hanu K BBQ in Los Angeles.
Matthew Kang

Kang Ho-Dong Baekjeong

Copy Link

Kang Ho Dong Baekjeong has proliferated around Los Angeles, and still remains a fun place to gather with friends, sip shots of soju, and partake in mostly very good meat on the tabletop grill. Some people prefer its neighbor Quarters, which is operated by the same restaurant group, but Kang Ho-Dong is the O.G.

Thick raw slices of meat on an open grate grill.
Kang Ho-Dong Baekjeong
[Official Photo]

Daedo Sikdang

Copy Link

This very intentional Korean barbecue spot from Seoul serves just American-certified Angus prime beef, and only ribeye steaks at that. Seared on specialized cast iron skillets, diners will try ribeyes sliced into three distinct cuts and served with kkakgudi and other banchan that are fermented in Korea and shipped to the U.S. Try the cold yeolmu guksu to wash it all down.

Beef grilling at Daedo Sikdang in Koreatown.
Beef grilling at Daedo Sikdang in Koreatown.
Wonho Frank Lee

Jeong Yuk Jeom Korean BBQ LA

Copy Link

Opened just before the pandemic and still holding onto premium-level meat, this sprawling, dimly lit Korean barbecue restaurant has a little bit of everything. Jeong Yuk Jeom’s best offering is dry-aged beef, something of a rarity in Koreatown these days. The butcher’s pride sets take a page from New York City’s award-winning Cote, with prime and dry-aged cuts at three different prices. Jeong Yuk Jeom is a good high-end KBBQ alternative for those who are tired of Park’s, Daedo, or AB Steak and want to try something new.

Prime ribeye beef on an open grate grill in Koreatown at Jeong Yuk Jeom.
Whole prime ribeye from Jeong Yuk Jeom on LA’s Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Magal BBQ

Copy Link

A big chain in Asia, Magal BBQ continues to prepare some of the best mid-range Korean barbecue in town, featuring flavorful off-cuts and non-primal selections that still offer plenty in the way of flavor. The combination plates work best for groups of four or more. The egg and fried rice volcano is a fun way to cap off meals here, too.

Magal Meats
Magal BBQ

It makes sense that the former Honey Pig space would become another Korean barbecue restaurant dedicated to pork. Using a similar wide cast iron grill that allows the juices and fat to slowly season and flavor spicy bean sprouts, onions, and kimchi to the sides, the show's star here is thick-cut Korean samgyupsal, or pork belly. The combinations here are very reasonable, about $100 for the combination beef and pork tasting that easily feeds four people.

Pork belly barbecue from Pigya in Koreatown.
Pork belly barbecue from Pigya in Koreatown with kimchi, bean sprouts, and sliced onions on a tabletop grill.
Matthew Kang

Soowon Galbi

Copy Link

Classic Korean barbecue Soowon might get a little overshadowed by its neighbor Park’s BBQ down the street, but the longtime restaurant still excels with high-quality beef and attentive service. A reliable star in the galaxy of Koreatown barbecue.

The fantastic set of banchan, rice, and tossed salad with dipping sauces at Soowon Galbi.
Banchan from Soowon Galbi.
Matthew Kang

Corner Place Restaurant

Copy Link

This classic Koreatown spot is a tad run down, and perhaps too bright, but that doesn’t deter families and locals from digging into the ample portions of marinated galbi and unmarinated beef tongue (the house specialty), finished with heaping bowls of cold dongchimi noodles. At this point, there’s no better old school Korean barbecue spot in Los Angeles.

Grilling meats at the Corner Place in Koreatown.
Grilling meats at the Corner Place in Koreatown.
Farley Elliott

Ong Ga Nae Korean BBQ Restaurant

Copy Link

With new management from Yangmani owner Jennifer Choi, Ong Ga Nae has been spruced up from top to bottom, with Choi’s husband now designing upscaled Korean barbecue dishes like an immense bulgogi jeongol laced with spinach, or hulking cuts of short ribs on the bone. Ong Ga Nae might not have the history of its prestigious neighbors Soowon and Park’s, but it’s a solid contender for a city always craving new Korean barbecue spots.

Bulgogi jeongol at Ong Ga Nae in Koreatown.
Bulgogi jeongol at Ong Ga Nae in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Park's BBQ

Copy Link

When people ask what the best Korean barbecue is in Los Angeles, most people will mention Park’s BBQ first. It’s hard to argue against over 20 years of excellence, with an energetic vibe inside and fantastic meat quality from start to finish. Chef and owner Jenee Kim does an amazing job with the non-meat dishes as well, like the delicious spicy braised black cod or the gochujang jjigae. Park’s is truly one of the most consistent Korean barbecue meals in LA.

Raw pieces of thinly sliced beef at Park’s BBQ on a steel tabletop grill.
Park’s BBQ.
Matthew Kang

Sun Ha Jang Restaurant

Copy Link

An originator of grilled duck barbecue in Los Angeles, this now-classic restaurant on the western edge of Koreatown still has some of the most delicious and remarkable Korean barbecue that doesn’t feature beef, pork, or chicken. Everything about the meal, from the banchan to the finishing fried rice on the tabletop grill, is engineered for maximum flavor.

Sun Ha Jang.
Sun Ha Jang
Matthew Kang

Yangmani

Copy Link

One of Koreatown’s most reliable barbecue spots, Yangmani has an expansive outdoor tented area for quality beef, pork, and offal cuts that younger diners tend to prefer in the neighborhood. Yangmani might be the best place if you want to take down bottles of beer and soju, and just have a good time with friends or coworkers.

Kimchi fried rice with gopchang from Yangmani in Koreatown.
Kimchi fried rice with gopchang from Yangmani in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Chosun Galbee

Copy Link

A higher-end Korean barbecue restaurant when so many places seem to change hands or vary in quality, Chosun Galbee is a family favorite for the Korean community when they want solid service, a nicer ambience, and excellent beef. The cold naengmyeon is a must-order.

Chosun Galbee kkotssal arrayed on a plate
Chosun Galbee kkotssal
Chosun Galbee

Mapo Dak Galbi

Copy Link

With a spartan interior and bustling dining room, Mapo Galbi is a spicy chicken specialist, grilling tender chicken thighs cut into smaller pieces along with cabbage, rice cakes, carrots, and plenty of gochujang sauce. The whole pan simmers and reduces over time, with servers finishing meals with a fried rice loaded up with perilla leaves and seaweed laver.

Dak galbi from Mapo in Koreatown in a steel pan.
Dak galbi from Mapo in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

ABSteak by Chef Akira Back

When Akira Back, who has multiple restaurants in Asia and Las Vegas, opened a steakhouse in LA, the original idea was to do a sort of Korean fusion with a focus on grilled beef. Now it’s an unabashed high-end Korean barbecue, with banchan and requisite side dishes that give it a complete Koreatown-style experience, only more west. At the moment, there might not be a more impressive place for Korean barbecue, from the sleek ambience to the helpful service.

Cuts of beef at ABSteak ready to be grilled.
Steaks ready for the grill at AB Steak.
ABSteak Los Angeles

Ten-Raku

One of the older, more established premium Korean barbecue spots, this focused restaurant has fantastic lunch specials and versatile dinner combinations that won’t break the bank. The mostly Korean crowd considers this one of the most reliable restaurants in town. Ten-raku also has a new AYCE spot in Lynwood.

Banchan and more from Tenraku, Koreatown.
Banchan and more from Tenraku.
Matthew Kang

Yerim Korean BBQ

All-you-can-eat Korean barbecue is a staple of the genre, but few execute the concept as well as Yerim, which offers very good sub-$40 menus with a wide array of high-quality meats like marinated short rib, beef tongue, and intestines. After a few drinks, tax, and tip, expect to pay $60 a person, which is a solid deal these days.

Yerim Korean Barbecue meats.
Yerim Korean Barbecue meats.
Matthew Kang

Prime K BBQ

This dimly lit but sleek restaurant tucked into a weirdly laid out commercial property feels almost hidden along a busy stretch of Western Avenue. But inside, find heaping plates of very high-end beef sliced and grilled for you at the table. The smallest combination comes in at around $140 and feeds two to three people easily. There’s nothing otherwise remarkable here except great meat and straightforward service, and the dining room full of mostly Korean-only speakers proves the community likes Prime’s simplicity.

High-grade beef from Prime K BBQ in Los Angeles on a large platter.
High-grade beef from Prime K BBQ in Los Angeles.
Matthew Kang

Hanu K BBQ

Hanu’s trick might be the banchan robots roaming the space, but the restaurant placed on the ground floor of one of LA’s larger spas serves some of the neighborhood’s best Korean barbecue menus. The smallest combination feeds potentially four people, and comes with an impressive array of jun, or fried vegetables and fish filets, and even galbijjim as a part of the package. The included galbijjim isn’t world-beating, but it’s nice to have on the table. Servers grill better-than-average meat (don’t expect Park’s or Chosun-level) but the whole table filled with dozens of different bites is what makes Hanu a fun meal.

Dishes and meat with the grill front and center at Hanu K BBQ in Los Angeles.
Dishes and meat with the grill front and center at Hanu K BBQ in Los Angeles.
Matthew Kang

Kang Ho-Dong Baekjeong

Kang Ho Dong Baekjeong has proliferated around Los Angeles, and still remains a fun place to gather with friends, sip shots of soju, and partake in mostly very good meat on the tabletop grill. Some people prefer its neighbor Quarters, which is operated by the same restaurant group, but Kang Ho-Dong is the O.G.

Thick raw slices of meat on an open grate grill.
Kang Ho-Dong Baekjeong
[Official Photo]

Daedo Sikdang

This very intentional Korean barbecue spot from Seoul serves just American-certified Angus prime beef, and only ribeye steaks at that. Seared on specialized cast iron skillets, diners will try ribeyes sliced into three distinct cuts and served with kkakgudi and other banchan that are fermented in Korea and shipped to the U.S. Try the cold yeolmu guksu to wash it all down.

Beef grilling at Daedo Sikdang in Koreatown.
Beef grilling at Daedo Sikdang in Koreatown.
Wonho Frank Lee

Jeong Yuk Jeom Korean BBQ LA

Opened just before the pandemic and still holding onto premium-level meat, this sprawling, dimly lit Korean barbecue restaurant has a little bit of everything. Jeong Yuk Jeom’s best offering is dry-aged beef, something of a rarity in Koreatown these days. The butcher’s pride sets take a page from New York City’s award-winning Cote, with prime and dry-aged cuts at three different prices. Jeong Yuk Jeom is a good high-end KBBQ alternative for those who are tired of Park’s, Daedo, or AB Steak and want to try something new.

Prime ribeye beef on an open grate grill in Koreatown at Jeong Yuk Jeom.
Whole prime ribeye from Jeong Yuk Jeom on LA’s Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Magal BBQ

A big chain in Asia, Magal BBQ continues to prepare some of the best mid-range Korean barbecue in town, featuring flavorful off-cuts and non-primal selections that still offer plenty in the way of flavor. The combination plates work best for groups of four or more. The egg and fried rice volcano is a fun way to cap off meals here, too.

Magal Meats
Magal BBQ

Pigya

It makes sense that the former Honey Pig space would become another Korean barbecue restaurant dedicated to pork. Using a similar wide cast iron grill that allows the juices and fat to slowly season and flavor spicy bean sprouts, onions, and kimchi to the sides, the show's star here is thick-cut Korean samgyupsal, or pork belly. The combinations here are very reasonable, about $100 for the combination beef and pork tasting that easily feeds four people.

Pork belly barbecue from Pigya in Koreatown.
Pork belly barbecue from Pigya in Koreatown with kimchi, bean sprouts, and sliced onions on a tabletop grill.
Matthew Kang

Soowon Galbi

Classic Korean barbecue Soowon might get a little overshadowed by its neighbor Park’s BBQ down the street, but the longtime restaurant still excels with high-quality beef and attentive service. A reliable star in the galaxy of Koreatown barbecue.

The fantastic set of banchan, rice, and tossed salad with dipping sauces at Soowon Galbi.
Banchan from Soowon Galbi.
Matthew Kang

Corner Place Restaurant

This classic Koreatown spot is a tad run down, and perhaps too bright, but that doesn’t deter families and locals from digging into the ample portions of marinated galbi and unmarinated beef tongue (the house specialty), finished with heaping bowls of cold dongchimi noodles. At this point, there’s no better old school Korean barbecue spot in Los Angeles.

Grilling meats at the Corner Place in Koreatown.
Grilling meats at the Corner Place in Koreatown.
Farley Elliott

Ong Ga Nae Korean BBQ Restaurant

With new management from Yangmani owner Jennifer Choi, Ong Ga Nae has been spruced up from top to bottom, with Choi’s husband now designing upscaled Korean barbecue dishes like an immense bulgogi jeongol laced with spinach, or hulking cuts of short ribs on the bone. Ong Ga Nae might not have the history of its prestigious neighbors Soowon and Park’s, but it’s a solid contender for a city always craving new Korean barbecue spots.

Bulgogi jeongol at Ong Ga Nae in Koreatown.
Bulgogi jeongol at Ong Ga Nae in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Park's BBQ

When people ask what the best Korean barbecue is in Los Angeles, most people will mention Park’s BBQ first. It’s hard to argue against over 20 years of excellence, with an energetic vibe inside and fantastic meat quality from start to finish. Chef and owner Jenee Kim does an amazing job with the non-meat dishes as well, like the delicious spicy braised black cod or the gochujang jjigae. Park’s is truly one of the most consistent Korean barbecue meals in LA.

Raw pieces of thinly sliced beef at Park’s BBQ on a steel tabletop grill.
Park’s BBQ.
Matthew Kang

Sun Ha Jang Restaurant

An originator of grilled duck barbecue in Los Angeles, this now-classic restaurant on the western edge of Koreatown still has some of the most delicious and remarkable Korean barbecue that doesn’t feature beef, pork, or chicken. Everything about the meal, from the banchan to the finishing fried rice on the tabletop grill, is engineered for maximum flavor.

Sun Ha Jang.
Sun Ha Jang
Matthew Kang

Related Maps

Yangmani

One of Koreatown’s most reliable barbecue spots, Yangmani has an expansive outdoor tented area for quality beef, pork, and offal cuts that younger diners tend to prefer in the neighborhood. Yangmani might be the best place if you want to take down bottles of beer and soju, and just have a good time with friends or coworkers.

Kimchi fried rice with gopchang from Yangmani in Koreatown.
Kimchi fried rice with gopchang from Yangmani in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Chosun Galbee

A higher-end Korean barbecue restaurant when so many places seem to change hands or vary in quality, Chosun Galbee is a family favorite for the Korean community when they want solid service, a nicer ambience, and excellent beef. The cold naengmyeon is a must-order.

Chosun Galbee kkotssal arrayed on a plate
Chosun Galbee kkotssal
Chosun Galbee

Mapo Dak Galbi

With a spartan interior and bustling dining room, Mapo Galbi is a spicy chicken specialist, grilling tender chicken thighs cut into smaller pieces along with cabbage, rice cakes, carrots, and plenty of gochujang sauce. The whole pan simmers and reduces over time, with servers finishing meals with a fried rice loaded up with perilla leaves and seaweed laver.

Dak galbi from Mapo in Koreatown in a steel pan.
Dak galbi from Mapo in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Related Maps