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A black table with several dishes holding food like fried chicken, chicken sandwich, corn cobs, blue cornbread, and mashed potatoes.
Fried chicken and sides from Le Coupe in Los Angeles.
Jakob Layman

The 16 Hottest New Restaurants in Los Angeles, December 2022

Where to eat right now around the City of Angels

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Fried chicken and sides from Le Coupe in Los Angeles.
| Jakob Layman

The Eater LA heatmap has existed for more than 15 years as a place to answer the age-old question: “Where should I eat tonight?” Though the scene has gone through tremendous challenges in the past nearly two years, the city’s spirit of breaking ground and exploring new cuisines continues with every month of openings.

Typically, places on this list are less than six months old, giving a sense of what’s new. For restaurants that have established themselves as one of the city’s essential places to eat, check out the Eater LA Essential 38. Restaurants are placed on the map in geographical order, from north to south.

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Crossroads Kitchen Calabasas

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Already one of LA’s most distinguished plant-based restaurants, Tal Ronnen has finally expanded his impressive Crossroads Kitchen to a third location, this time in Calabasas (the second was in Las Vegas at Resorts World). Sporting a moody, multi-faceted space with indoor and outdoor seating should make it an easy hit with locals, who will happily dive into faux caviar with dip and potato chips, carbonara with egg “yolk,” and other California-Italian fare presented with elegant finesse.

An assortment of vegan dishes from Crossroads Kitchen in Calabasas.
Vegan pastas and other dishes from Crossroads Kitchen in Calabasas.
Wonho Frank Lee

Borekas Sephardic Pastries

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This humble takeout window in Sherman Oaks, helmed by an Israeli couple serving brown-butter bourekas (a flaky, savory filled pastry), is getting so much attention that it’s selling out daily. Chef-owner Uzi Wizman puts his own spin on the hand-held treat, creating a hybrid dough that sits between phyllo and croissant. His boureka fillings run the gamut from mushroom and truffles to a house-made, ricotta-like cheese paired with za’atar. As a bonus, the pastries come with a hard-boiled egg, pickles, and dipping sauces. Complete the breakfast (or lunch) with one of its other alluring offerings: Turkish coffee. 

Four to-go cardboard boxes on the hood of a car, filled with bourekas from Borekas.
Flaky pastries with accoutrements from Borekas
Farley Elliott

Howlin' Ray's

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The work of many years has finally come to an end for Johnny Ray Zone and Amanda Chapman, who debut their full-fledged Nashville hot chicken restaurant that offers plenty of on-site seating, mountains of spicy chicken, and even some 40-ounce bottles of Miller High Life to help wash it all down. Like the Chinatown original (which remains open but only for takeout and delivery) in the early days, the lines are already going around the building.

Nashville-style hot chicken, and a large bottle of beer with sauces at Howlin’ Ray’s on a red tray.
Nashville-style hot chicken, and a large bottle of beer with sauces at Howlin’ Ray’s.
Wonho Frank Lee

Bub and Grandma's Restaurant

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The perennial long lines at the Bub & Grandma’s stalls at farmers markets have been an indicator of good things to come: in other words, an equally busy opening for baker and owner Andy Kadin’s first restaurant. At his classic diner-inspired Glassell Park location, Kadin still offers his highly sought-after loaves of bread, but with the addition of breakfast and lunchtime sandwiches. Imagine bacon, egg and cheese on freshly baked kaiser rolls; muffuletas; and roasted cauliflower with cheddar on a Bub’s sub. Save room for the desserts, like fresh donuts and pastry chef Christopher Lier’s gorgeous lime custard pie.

Sandwiches and sides from Bub and Grandma’s.
Sandwiches and sides from Bub and Grandma’s.
Wonho Frank Lee

Lemon Grove

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Marcel Vigneron takes over this somewhat secluded rooftop restaurant in Hollywood. Though technically part of a members-only hotel, the restaurant is open to the public, with the former Top Chef contestant serving everything from lemon chitarra pasta to bone-in ribeye steaks. Hollywood’s Vinyl District has some flashier places to dine, but this one could become the underrated gem of the bunch.

Grilled prawns with lemon, greens, and an aioli dip on a plate at Lemon Grove restaurant in Hollywood, California.
Grilled prawns from Lemon Grove in Hollywood.
Lemon Grove

Gunsmoke

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Brandon Kida, best known as the executive chef at Hinoki & the Bird in Century City and more casual concepts Go Go Gyoza and Go Go Bird in Culver City, is putting his personal stamp on Japanese American cooking in Hollywood. The buzzy menu, informed by Kida’s second-generation Nikkei experience, includes whitefish crudo with melon and burnt scallion oil, as well as lamb sisig with pickled jicama and tobanjan.

Local rockfish with chile jam, and crispy shallots at Gunsmoke in Hollywood.
Rockfish with chile jam at Gunsmoke.
Erick Turcios

Tet-a-Tet

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When the sun begins to set over Silver Lake, daytime darling All Day Baby transitions into Tet-a-Tet, an energetic Vietnamese pop-up inspired by chef Jonathan Whitener’s Little Saigon upbringing and co-owner Lien Ta’s heritage. The evenings-only offerings even include specialty cocktails, like the Pleasing Smile made with jasmine-buttered Abasolo Mexican whisky. The food menu is chock-full of large and small plates that hit all the familiar Vietnamese notes: pungent, spicy, and full of zing. Start with the pate chaud and crispy imperial rolls before diving into smoked chicken wings, pigs trotters, and a whole fish, if appetites allow.

Oxtail stew with hominy, Maui onion, scallion oil, herbs, pickled jalapeno, and salsa macha at Tet-a-Tet at All Day Baby.
Tet-A-Tet’s oxtail stew.
Andre Karimloo

Le Coupe

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Craig and Kristen Walker have taken their pandemic-era fried chicken restaurant, previously in a cloud kitchen, and turned it into a takeout-ready marvel in this part of Melrose Hill, in a building already studded with social media stars Ggiata Deli and Kuya Lord. Taking flavors from Louisiana, the Walkers bring a polished take on comfort fare, from feta-topped watermelon salad to a glorious fried chicken sandwich.

Hamburger buns around a stack of fried chicken, coleslaw, and pickles.
Fried chicken sandwich from Le Coupe in Melrose Hill.
Jakob Layman

Kuya Lord

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The lines grow early at Kuya Lord in Melrose Hill. This tiny shop from chef Maynard Llera is the work of years of waiting and pop-ups, cooking some of Los Angeles’s best Filipino food wherever he could. Now Llera and company have a place to call their own, and the word is very much out. Here, you’ll find individual rice bowls topped with crispy lechon to pancit noodles with shrimp. And then there are the larger format “Kuya Trays,” a smorgasbord of sharable offerings, such as java rice, grilled chicken, and prawns slathered in a garlic crab sauce.

An overhead shot of a takeout bowl filled with pork belly crisped at the edges, over noodles.
Pork belly from Kuya Lord
Farley Elliott

Ramen King Keisuke

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With an ambitious expansion plan already in progress, Ramen King Keisuke has planted itself in Monterey Park, as well as in Class A malls like the Westfiel Century City and a very soon-to-open outlet in Torrance’s Del Amo Mall. With more than a dozen more locations scheduled to open across Southern California, the so-called world champion of ramen looks to dominate the already buzzy ramen scene in LA. But the soup started with chef Keisuke Takeda, whose celebrated recipes include 10-hour tonkotsu broth, a pricey but umami-riddled lobster broth, hulking slices of pork, and even a vegan ramen.

A bowl full of ramen noodles, eggs, onions, and pork.
Lobster ramen.
Ramen King Keisuke

Hearts & Flame

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It wasn’t going to be long before the excellent, expansive space that was once Inko Nito became another ambitious Arts District restaurant. Now with Italian chef Michele Brogi behind the stoves, the coastal Italian menu at Hearts & Flame spans everything from grilled steaks to blistered prawns to fresh pasta. It’s hard to say if the recipe will capture the hearts (and stomachs) of Angelenos, but initial reports seem very promising.

A grilled ribeye over an open grill at Hearts & Flame restaurant in Los Angeles, California.
Grilled steak at Hearts & Flame in the Arts District.
Hearts & Flame

Pizzeria Bianco

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Chef Chris Bianco is back, ready to take on Los Angeles anew with signature pizzas and California sides that only this Phoenix phenomenon could pull off. Fresh off being featured on Netflix’s new Chefs Table: Pizza series, Bianco has leaned into making his wood-fired pies the star of his restaurant, with toppings like soppressata and Gaeta olives, and red onions with Santa Barbara pistachios. The small but focused dinner menu highlights starters like farinata (an Italian chickpea pancake) and spiedini (fontina wrapped in prosciutto). Dinner reservations are hard to come by, so book ahead.

A blistered pizza with light cream and pistacio.
Pizzeria Bianco
Pizzeria Bianco

Westsiders now have easier access to Konbi’s tri-cut Japanese-style sandwiches and expertly prepared French pastries — and they’re clearly excited about it, given the lines that stretched out in front of the One Culver storefront for weeks after its late-August opening. Konbi’s introduced new items at this outpost, including a superlative ham-and-cheese croissant and a more extensive selection of its gelato-style ice cream. Don’t sleep on the dairy-free pistachio when it’s available.

A tuna sandwich on milk bread, cut into three pieces.
Konbi’s tuna sandwich.
Wonho Frank Lee

Heavy Handed

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Hungry Westsiders looking to gorge themselves on short-rib cheeseburgers, loaded fries, and cones topped with impossibly dense Straus Creamery soft serve get their fix at this new burger window on Santa Monica’s Main Street. It’s the first brick-and-mortar for Valley natives Danny Gordon and Max Miller, who launched a pop-up during the pandemic and became known for their not-quite-smashed burgers topped with American cheese, house-made bread and butter pickles, caramelized onions, and tangy sauce. The duo built a following in lightning-fast speed — as evidenced by the lines stretching around the corner.

A cheeseburger topped with pickles, sauce, and caramelized onions from Heavy Handed.
A cheeseburger at Heavy Handed.
Wonho Frank Lee

Paloma Venice

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Paloma, a new restaurant perched at the corner of Abbot Kinney and Venice Boulevard in a space once occupied by wine bar Zinque and then (briefly) Argentine wine bar Varro, may have the patio prowess to break the location’s apparent curse. The patio, which its owners have transformed into a Tulum-ish hideaway with rattan chairs and chandeliers, envelops diners in greenery (see the bougainvillea snaking across the slatted roof) and its muted spa-blue color scheme. The best items on the menu are shareable starters: think a smoky eggplant dip dotted with paprika and a burrata balloon surrounded by shaved prosciutto and crusty bread. The food isn’t the main draw, though — so come for drinks and an ambience that can make a warm, slothful Venice afternoon seem even more relaxed.

An outdoor dining area with hanging lamps and plants at Paloma restaurant in Venice, California.
The patio at Paloma.
Stan Lee

Dear Jane's

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Think of Dear Jane’s as the seafood-driven sister restaurant to Culver City steakhouse Dear John’s. The Marina del Rey waterfront spot with a moody bar is a love letter to old-school, classy American dining, with low-key nautical decor and new twists on throwback dishes. Helmed by the husband-and-wife duo behind Rockenwagner Bakery and Mélisse chef-owner Josiah Citrin, Dear Jane’s has roving carts with tableside-tossed chopped shrimp Louie, fish sticks paired with caviar, and clams casino punctuated with chorizo and smoked piquillo pepper. Adding to the allure of the restaurant: actress Jamie Lee Curtis’s voice on the recording of the restaurant’s voicemail.

Fried fish sticks topped with caviar and served on a fish-shaped board at Dear Jane’s.
Bougie fish sticks at Dear Jane’s.
Wonho Frank Lee

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Crossroads Kitchen Calabasas

Already one of LA’s most distinguished plant-based restaurants, Tal Ronnen has finally expanded his impressive Crossroads Kitchen to a third location, this time in Calabasas (the second was in Las Vegas at Resorts World). Sporting a moody, multi-faceted space with indoor and outdoor seating should make it an easy hit with locals, who will happily dive into faux caviar with dip and potato chips, carbonara with egg “yolk,” and other California-Italian fare presented with elegant finesse.

An assortment of vegan dishes from Crossroads Kitchen in Calabasas.
Vegan pastas and other dishes from Crossroads Kitchen in Calabasas.
Wonho Frank Lee

Borekas Sephardic Pastries

This humble takeout window in Sherman Oaks, helmed by an Israeli couple serving brown-butter bourekas (a flaky, savory filled pastry), is getting so much attention that it’s selling out daily. Chef-owner Uzi Wizman puts his own spin on the hand-held treat, creating a hybrid dough that sits between phyllo and croissant. His boureka fillings run the gamut from mushroom and truffles to a house-made, ricotta-like cheese paired with za’atar. As a bonus, the pastries come with a hard-boiled egg, pickles, and dipping sauces. Complete the breakfast (or lunch) with one of its other alluring offerings: Turkish coffee. 

Four to-go cardboard boxes on the hood of a car, filled with bourekas from Borekas.
Flaky pastries with accoutrements from Borekas
Farley Elliott

Howlin' Ray's

The work of many years has finally come to an end for Johnny Ray Zone and Amanda Chapman, who debut their full-fledged Nashville hot chicken restaurant that offers plenty of on-site seating, mountains of spicy chicken, and even some 40-ounce bottles of Miller High Life to help wash it all down. Like the Chinatown original (which remains open but only for takeout and delivery) in the early days, the lines are already going around the building.

Nashville-style hot chicken, and a large bottle of beer with sauces at Howlin’ Ray’s on a red tray.
Nashville-style hot chicken, and a large bottle of beer with sauces at Howlin’ Ray’s.
Wonho Frank Lee

Bub and Grandma's Restaurant

The perennial long lines at the Bub & Grandma’s stalls at farmers markets have been an indicator of good things to come: in other words, an equally busy opening for baker and owner Andy Kadin’s first restaurant. At his classic diner-inspired Glassell Park location, Kadin still offers his highly sought-after loaves of bread, but with the addition of breakfast and lunchtime sandwiches. Imagine bacon, egg and cheese on freshly baked kaiser rolls; muffuletas; and roasted cauliflower with cheddar on a Bub’s sub. Save room for the desserts, like fresh donuts and pastry chef Christopher Lier’s gorgeous lime custard pie.

Sandwiches and sides from Bub and Grandma’s.
Sandwiches and sides from Bub and Grandma’s.
Wonho Frank Lee

Lemon Grove

Marcel Vigneron takes over this somewhat secluded rooftop restaurant in Hollywood. Though technically part of a members-only hotel, the restaurant is open to the public, with the former Top Chef contestant serving everything from lemon chitarra pasta to bone-in ribeye steaks. Hollywood’s Vinyl District has some flashier places to dine, but this one could become the underrated gem of the bunch.

Grilled prawns with lemon, greens, and an aioli dip on a plate at Lemon Grove restaurant in Hollywood, California.
Grilled prawns from Lemon Grove in Hollywood.
Lemon Grove

Gunsmoke

Brandon Kida, best known as the executive chef at Hinoki & the Bird in Century City and more casual concepts Go Go Gyoza and Go Go Bird in Culver City, is putting his personal stamp on Japanese American cooking in Hollywood. The buzzy menu, informed by Kida’s second-generation Nikkei experience, includes whitefish crudo with melon and burnt scallion oil, as well as lamb sisig with pickled jicama and tobanjan.

Local rockfish with chile jam, and crispy shallots at Gunsmoke in Hollywood.
Rockfish with chile jam at Gunsmoke.
Erick Turcios

Tet-a-Tet

When the sun begins to set over Silver Lake, daytime darling All Day Baby transitions into Tet-a-Tet, an energetic Vietnamese pop-up inspired by chef Jonathan Whitener’s Little Saigon upbringing and co-owner Lien Ta’s heritage. The evenings-only offerings even include specialty cocktails, like the Pleasing Smile made with jasmine-buttered Abasolo Mexican whisky. The food menu is chock-full of large and small plates that hit all the familiar Vietnamese notes: pungent, spicy, and full of zing. Start with the pate chaud and crispy imperial rolls before diving into smoked chicken wings, pigs trotters, and a whole fish, if appetites allow.

Oxtail stew with hominy, Maui onion, scallion oil, herbs, pickled jalapeno, and salsa macha at Tet-a-Tet at All Day Baby.
Tet-A-Tet’s oxtail stew.
Andre Karimloo

Le Coupe

Craig and Kristen Walker have taken their pandemic-era fried chicken restaurant, previously in a cloud kitchen, and turned it into a takeout-ready marvel in this part of Melrose Hill, in a building already studded with social media stars Ggiata Deli and Kuya Lord. Taking flavors from Louisiana, the Walkers bring a polished take on comfort fare, from feta-topped watermelon salad to a glorious fried chicken sandwich.

Hamburger buns around a stack of fried chicken, coleslaw, and pickles.
Fried chicken sandwich from Le Coupe in Melrose Hill.
Jakob Layman

Kuya Lord

The lines grow early at Kuya Lord in Melrose Hill. This tiny shop from chef Maynard Llera is the work of years of waiting and pop-ups, cooking some of Los Angeles’s best Filipino food wherever he could. Now Llera and company have a place to call their own, and the word is very much out. Here, you’ll find individual rice bowls topped with crispy lechon to pancit noodles with shrimp. And then there are the larger format “Kuya Trays,” a smorgasbord of sharable offerings, such as java rice, grilled chicken, and prawns slathered in a garlic crab sauce.

An overhead shot of a takeout bowl filled with pork belly crisped at the edges, over noodles.
Pork belly from Kuya Lord
Farley Elliott

Ramen King Keisuke

With an ambitious expansion plan already in progress, Ramen King Keisuke has planted itself in Monterey Park, as well as in Class A malls like the Westfiel Century City and a very soon-to-open outlet in Torrance’s Del Amo Mall. With more than a dozen more locations scheduled to open across Southern California, the so-called world champion of ramen looks to dominate the already buzzy ramen scene in LA. But the soup started with chef Keisuke Takeda, whose celebrated recipes include 10-hour tonkotsu broth, a pricey but umami-riddled lobster broth, hulking slices of pork, and even a vegan ramen.

A bowl full of ramen noodles, eggs, onions, and pork.
Lobster ramen.
Ramen King Keisuke

Hearts & Flame

It wasn’t going to be long before the excellent, expansive space that was once Inko Nito became another ambitious Arts District restaurant. Now with Italian chef Michele Brogi behind the stoves, the coastal Italian menu at Hearts & Flame spans everything from grilled steaks to blistered prawns to fresh pasta. It’s hard to say if the recipe will capture the hearts (and stomachs) of Angelenos, but initial reports seem very promising.

A grilled ribeye over an open grill at Hearts & Flame restaurant in Los Angeles, California.
Grilled steak at Hearts & Flame in the Arts District.
Hearts & Flame

Pizzeria Bianco

Chef Chris Bianco is back, ready to take on Los Angeles anew with signature pizzas and California sides that only this Phoenix phenomenon could pull off. Fresh off being featured on Netflix’s new Chefs Table: Pizza series, Bianco has leaned into making his wood-fired pies the star of his restaurant, with toppings like soppressata and Gaeta olives, and red onions with Santa Barbara pistachios. The small but focused dinner menu highlights starters like farinata (an Italian chickpea pancake) and spiedini (fontina wrapped in prosciutto). Dinner reservations are hard to come by, so book ahead.

A blistered pizza with light cream and pistacio.
Pizzeria Bianco
Pizzeria Bianco

Konbi

Westsiders now have easier access to Konbi’s tri-cut Japanese-style sandwiches and expertly prepared French pastries — and they’re clearly excited about it, given the lines that stretched out in front of the One Culver storefront for weeks after its late-August opening. Konbi’s introduced new items at this outpost, including a superlative ham-and-cheese croissant and a more extensive selection of its gelato-style ice cream. Don’t sleep on the dairy-free pistachio when it’s available.

A tuna sandwich on milk bread, cut into three pieces.
Konbi’s tuna sandwich.
Wonho Frank Lee

Heavy Handed

Hungry Westsiders looking to gorge themselves on short-rib cheeseburgers, loaded fries, and cones topped with impossibly dense Straus Creamery soft serve get their fix at this new burger window on Santa Monica’s Main Street. It’s the first brick-and-mortar for Valley natives Danny Gordon and Max Miller, who launched a pop-up during the pandemic and became known for their not-quite-smashed burgers topped with American cheese, house-made bread and butter pickles, caramelized onions, and tangy sauce. The duo built a following in lightning-fast speed — as evidenced by the lines stretching around the corner.

A cheeseburger topped with pickles, sauce, and caramelized onions from Heavy Handed.
A cheeseburger at Heavy Handed.
Wonho Frank Lee

Paloma Venice

Paloma, a new restaurant perched at the corner of Abbot Kinney and Venice Boulevard in a space once occupied by wine bar Zinque and then (briefly) Argentine wine bar Varro, may have the patio prowess to break the location’s apparent curse. The patio, which its owners have transformed into a Tulum-ish hideaway with rattan chairs and chandeliers, envelops diners in greenery (see the bougainvillea snaking across the slatted roof) and its muted spa-blue color scheme. The best items on the menu are shareable starters: think a smoky eggplant dip dotted with paprika and a burrata balloon surrounded by shaved prosciutto and crusty bread. The food isn’t the main draw, though — so come for drinks and an ambience that can make a warm, slothful Venice afternoon seem even more relaxed.

An outdoor dining area with hanging lamps and plants at Paloma restaurant in Venice, California.
The patio at Paloma.
Stan Lee

Related Maps

Dear Jane's

Think of Dear Jane’s as the seafood-driven sister restaurant to Culver City steakhouse Dear John’s. The Marina del Rey waterfront spot with a moody bar is a love letter to old-school, classy American dining, with low-key nautical decor and new twists on throwback dishes. Helmed by the husband-and-wife duo behind Rockenwagner Bakery and Mélisse chef-owner Josiah Citrin, Dear Jane’s has roving carts with tableside-tossed chopped shrimp Louie, fish sticks paired with caviar, and clams casino punctuated with chorizo and smoked piquillo pepper. Adding to the allure of the restaurant: actress Jamie Lee Curtis’s voice on the recording of the restaurant’s voicemail.

Fried fish sticks topped with caviar and served on a fish-shaped board at Dear Jane’s.
Bougie fish sticks at Dear Jane’s.
Wonho Frank Lee

Related Maps