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Tonnarelli al tartufo e salsiccia at Spina in Atwater Village.
Tonnarelli al tartufo e salsiccia at Spina in Atwater Village.
Cathy Chaplin

17 Phenomenal Places for Pasta in Los Angeles

LA has always had a love affair with all things Italian

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Tonnarelli al tartufo e salsiccia at Spina in Atwater Village.
| Cathy Chaplin

Los Angeles is chock-full of great places for pasta, which is ironic considering its reputation as a carb-fearing town. Restaurants across the Southland are serving silky strands rooted in Italian tradition and fusing them with chefs’ culinary sensibilities and California’s pristine seasonal produce — it’s a winning Cal-Ital formula. Here now are 17 restaurants to dive into a stellar plate of noodles in Los Angeles.

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Union Restaurant

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Nab a table at Union for a taste of chef Christopher Keyser’s cooking. The torchetti is topped with a Calabrese pork ragu, ricotta, crispy rosemary leaves, and best of all, an intense dried chile oil that the chef calls “pizza grease.” The squid ink lumache with Maine lobster and truffle butter satisfies with subtlety.

Amiga Amore

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Danielle Duran-Zecca and her husband Alessandro Zecca opened Amiga Amore in Highland Park in 2023. The restaurant’s menu brings together Mexican and Italian flavors with an outstanding selection of original pasta dishes. The signature elote agnolotti is filled with corn and cotija cheese and finished with housemade Tajin and finger limes. The huitlacoche cacio pepe melds the Roman classic with earthy corn smut and a 63-degree egg.

Yellow-orange stuffed pasta with edible flowers in a bowl at Amiga Amore.
Elote agnolotti at Amiga Amore in Highland Park.
Wonho Frank Lee

Spina brings plenty of pasta by chef Pablo Cruz to Atwater Village using noodles from Mani In Pasta, a wholesale handmade Italian pasta company founded by one of the restaurant’s partners. The half-dozen primi include classics like cacio e pepe and ricotta-stuffed ravioli with butter and sage, along with pricier items like the lobster linguine in tomato sauce. The tonnarelli al tartufo e salsiccia rings in at nearly $40, but with fresh truffles and a sausage tomato sauce, it might just be worth it.

A trio of pastas at Spina in Atwater Village.
A trio of pastas at Spina in Atwater Village.
Cathy Chaplin

Chef Matt Molina’s Hippo in Highland Park continues to draw crowds hungry for a California take on handmade pasta, large-format proteins, and plenty of cocktails. The patio is especially fetching this time of year, and so is the corn-stuffed agnolotti — get it if it’s on the menu.

Pasta with clams at Hippo in Highland Park.
Pasta with clams at Hippo in Highland Park.
Wonho Frank Lee

Ètra, the Cal-Italian restaurant in Melrose Hill by chef Evan Algorri, features six kinds of pasta on the menu. The chef has a penchant for dry noodles over fresh ones and uses them accordingly in memorable preparations like the rigatoni Gricia with guanciale and a silky onion soubise, and the basil-tinged bavette nerano dotted with little mussels.

Rigatoni Gricia with guanciale, onion soubise, pecorino Romano at Etra.
Rigatoni Gricia with guanciale, onion soubise, pecorino Romano at Etra.
Wonho Frank Lee

Pijja Palace

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Indian and Italian flavors mingle beautifully at this Indian sports bar decked out in neutral tones in the former Happy Foot/Sad Foot clinic in Silver Lake. Pasta offerings from Roberta’s alum, Miles Shorey, include rigatoni with coriander-spiked tomato masala and cream, and shells with nihari braised lamb, fennel, and sumac yogurt.

Malai rigatoni at Pijja Palace in Silver Lake.
Malai rigatoni at Pijja Palace in Silver Lake.
Wonho Frank Lee

Antico Nuovo

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The perfect meal at chef Chad Colby’s Antico Nuovo begins with a piping hot focaccia, followed by all the pastas a party can handle. The half-dozen or so varieties change with the season and the chef’s whims. The delicate rabbit-filled parcels (plin dell’ alta langa) are not to be missed, along with the classic pappardelle with beef cheek and veal tongue ragu. Snag a seat along the open kitchen for a front-row view of all the magic.

Ravioli di nonna at Antico Nuovo.
Ravioli di nonna.
Wonho Frank Lee/Eater LA

Angelini Osteria

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Angelini Osteria is a Beverly Boulevard legend thanks to chef Gino Angelini and his incredible pasta-making skills. From the restaurant’s signature lemon cream pasta to ones made with sea urchin — this is a true pasta haven. The fried basil-topped lasagna is notable as well.

It’s hard to deny that chef Evan Funke’s eponymous restaurant in Beverly Hills is the new epicenter of pasta in Los Angeles. The restaurant’s two-story glass-and-steel workshop cranks out a dozen different shapes: six formed by hand and six that are extruded. In addition to the popular pastas served at the chef’s other restaurants (Mother Wolf and Felix), Funke brings in a few newcomers like the Piemontese classic agnolotti del plin.

Agnolotti dal Plin at Funke.
Agnolotti dal Plin at Funke in Beverly Hills.
Wonho Frank Lee

La Dolce Vita

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LA isn’t known for its red sauce spots, but the rebooted La Dolce Vita may change some minds. The menu features five different kinds of pasta including classic spaghetti and meatballs, a delightful tagliatelle vongole with plenty of clams and parsley, and a luscious bucatini al limoni. Tack on a chilled seafood salad and a crisp-cold martini for a standout evening.

Clam pasta at La Dolce Vita in Beverly Hills.
Clam pasta at La Dolce Vita in Beverly Hills.
Cathy Chaplin

Jemma Di Mare

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Top Chef’s Jackson Kalb brings a plethora of East Coast Italian seafood to the main San Vicente Boulevard strip. While the linguine alle vongole and the squid ink prawn scampi are sure to please, it’s the whole lobster fettuccini for two that everyone’s talking about.

Lobster fettuccini at Jemma Di Mare in Brentwood.
Lobster fettuccini at Jemma Di Mare in Brentwood.
Wonho Frank Lee

The Factory Kitchen

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It’s been a decade since the Factory Kitchen opened its doors and wowed diners with its magnificent mandilli di seta, handkerchief pasta in a basil-almond pesto. Swing into the Arts District stalwart for the signature dish, along with pillowy plates of gnocchi ladled with veal sugo and tangles of tagliatelle served with a braised venison ragu.

Dinner is served at the Factory Kitchen in the Arts District.
Dinner is served at the Factory Kitchen in the Arts District.
The Factory Kitchen

Rossoblu

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Inspired by the cuisine of Bologna, Italy, Steve Samson’s open, airy Rossoblu is the place for long-simmered meat sauces that coat stunning iterations of housemade noodles: Think pastas like delicate tortelloni with Swiss chard, ricotta, and butter, or matagliati prepared with two kinds of mushrooms.

Tagliatelle with a beef-and-pork ragu at Rossoblu in Downtown.
Tagliatelle with a beef-and-pork ragu at Rossoblu in Downtown.
Rossoblu

Cento Pasta Bar

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This former pop-up, which ran for several years as a lunch residency at Downtown’s Mignon, landed a brick-and-mortar location with generous outdoor seating in West Adams in 2021. Pasta preparations include spaghetti topped with a generous dollop of burrata and golden slabs of Santa Barbara sea urchin, as well as linguini bathed in sweet corn carbonara.

A trio of pastas at Cento Pasta Bar in West Adams.
A trio of pastas at Cento Pasta Bar in West Adams.
Cento Pasta Bar

Pasta Sisters

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Whether they’re in the mood to hop behind the stove or just simply reheat, Pasta Sisters has noodle lovers covered. Freshly made spaghetti, tagliatelle, pappardelle, and lasagna sheets are available for sale, along with composed dishes like pasta with bottarga and pasta with porcini mushrooms.

Porcini mushroom tagliatelle at Pasta Sisters.
Porcini mushroom tagliatelle at Pasta Sisters.
Matthew Kang

Sunday Gravy

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Straightforward and satisfying Italian American fare is the specialty at Sunday Gravy. This brother-and-sister operation prepares the genre’s greatest hits like cheesy garlic bread, bread pudding topped with Nancy Silverton’s gelato, and a hearty bolognese made with locally prepared pasta for lunch and dinner.  

La Parolaccia

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It’s all about Roman classics at La Parolaccia in Long Beach. While the pizzas and starters are done right, it’s the mother pastas like amatriciana, carbonara, and cacio e pepe that deserve diners’ full attention. Bring a large group and share them all.

A bowl of carbonara in a yellow and white bowl at La Parolaccia.
A bowl of carbonara at La Parolaccia.
Brian Addison

Union Restaurant

Nab a table at Union for a taste of chef Christopher Keyser’s cooking. The torchetti is topped with a Calabrese pork ragu, ricotta, crispy rosemary leaves, and best of all, an intense dried chile oil that the chef calls “pizza grease.” The squid ink lumache with Maine lobster and truffle butter satisfies with subtlety.

Amiga Amore

Danielle Duran-Zecca and her husband Alessandro Zecca opened Amiga Amore in Highland Park in 2023. The restaurant’s menu brings together Mexican and Italian flavors with an outstanding selection of original pasta dishes. The signature elote agnolotti is filled with corn and cotija cheese and finished with housemade Tajin and finger limes. The huitlacoche cacio pepe melds the Roman classic with earthy corn smut and a 63-degree egg.

Yellow-orange stuffed pasta with edible flowers in a bowl at Amiga Amore.
Elote agnolotti at Amiga Amore in Highland Park.
Wonho Frank Lee

Spina

Spina brings plenty of pasta by chef Pablo Cruz to Atwater Village using noodles from Mani In Pasta, a wholesale handmade Italian pasta company founded by one of the restaurant’s partners. The half-dozen primi include classics like cacio e pepe and ricotta-stuffed ravioli with butter and sage, along with pricier items like the lobster linguine in tomato sauce. The tonnarelli al tartufo e salsiccia rings in at nearly $40, but with fresh truffles and a sausage tomato sauce, it might just be worth it.

A trio of pastas at Spina in Atwater Village.
A trio of pastas at Spina in Atwater Village.
Cathy Chaplin

Hippo

Chef Matt Molina’s Hippo in Highland Park continues to draw crowds hungry for a California take on handmade pasta, large-format proteins, and plenty of cocktails. The patio is especially fetching this time of year, and so is the corn-stuffed agnolotti — get it if it’s on the menu.

Pasta with clams at Hippo in Highland Park.
Pasta with clams at Hippo in Highland Park.
Wonho Frank Lee

Ètra

Ètra, the Cal-Italian restaurant in Melrose Hill by chef Evan Algorri, features six kinds of pasta on the menu. The chef has a penchant for dry noodles over fresh ones and uses them accordingly in memorable preparations like the rigatoni Gricia with guanciale and a silky onion soubise, and the basil-tinged bavette nerano dotted with little mussels.

Rigatoni Gricia with guanciale, onion soubise, pecorino Romano at Etra.
Rigatoni Gricia with guanciale, onion soubise, pecorino Romano at Etra.
Wonho Frank Lee

Pijja Palace

Indian and Italian flavors mingle beautifully at this Indian sports bar decked out in neutral tones in the former Happy Foot/Sad Foot clinic in Silver Lake. Pasta offerings from Roberta’s alum, Miles Shorey, include rigatoni with coriander-spiked tomato masala and cream, and shells with nihari braised lamb, fennel, and sumac yogurt.

Malai rigatoni at Pijja Palace in Silver Lake.
Malai rigatoni at Pijja Palace in Silver Lake.
Wonho Frank Lee

Antico Nuovo

The perfect meal at chef Chad Colby’s Antico Nuovo begins with a piping hot focaccia, followed by all the pastas a party can handle. The half-dozen or so varieties change with the season and the chef’s whims. The delicate rabbit-filled parcels (plin dell’ alta langa) are not to be missed, along with the classic pappardelle with beef cheek and veal tongue ragu. Snag a seat along the open kitchen for a front-row view of all the magic.

Ravioli di nonna at Antico Nuovo.
Ravioli di nonna.
Wonho Frank Lee/Eater LA

Angelini Osteria

Angelini Osteria is a Beverly Boulevard legend thanks to chef Gino Angelini and his incredible pasta-making skills. From the restaurant’s signature lemon cream pasta to ones made with sea urchin — this is a true pasta haven. The fried basil-topped lasagna is notable as well.

Funke

It’s hard to deny that chef Evan Funke’s eponymous restaurant in Beverly Hills is the new epicenter of pasta in Los Angeles. The restaurant’s two-story glass-and-steel workshop cranks out a dozen different shapes: six formed by hand and six that are extruded. In addition to the popular pastas served at the chef’s other restaurants (Mother Wolf and Felix), Funke brings in a few newcomers like the Piemontese classic agnolotti del plin.

Agnolotti dal Plin at Funke.
Agnolotti dal Plin at Funke in Beverly Hills.
Wonho Frank Lee

La Dolce Vita

LA isn’t known for its red sauce spots, but the rebooted La Dolce Vita may change some minds. The menu features five different kinds of pasta including classic spaghetti and meatballs, a delightful tagliatelle vongole with plenty of clams and parsley, and a luscious bucatini al limoni. Tack on a chilled seafood salad and a crisp-cold martini for a standout evening.

Clam pasta at La Dolce Vita in Beverly Hills.
Clam pasta at La Dolce Vita in Beverly Hills.
Cathy Chaplin

Jemma Di Mare

Top Chef’s Jackson Kalb brings a plethora of East Coast Italian seafood to the main San Vicente Boulevard strip. While the linguine alle vongole and the squid ink prawn scampi are sure to please, it’s the whole lobster fettuccini for two that everyone’s talking about.

Lobster fettuccini at Jemma Di Mare in Brentwood.
Lobster fettuccini at Jemma Di Mare in Brentwood.
Wonho Frank Lee

The Factory Kitchen

It’s been a decade since the Factory Kitchen opened its doors and wowed diners with its magnificent mandilli di seta, handkerchief pasta in a basil-almond pesto. Swing into the Arts District stalwart for the signature dish, along with pillowy plates of gnocchi ladled with veal sugo and tangles of tagliatelle served with a braised venison ragu.

Dinner is served at the Factory Kitchen in the Arts District.
Dinner is served at the Factory Kitchen in the Arts District.
The Factory Kitchen

Rossoblu

Inspired by the cuisine of Bologna, Italy, Steve Samson’s open, airy Rossoblu is the place for long-simmered meat sauces that coat stunning iterations of housemade noodles: Think pastas like delicate tortelloni with Swiss chard, ricotta, and butter, or matagliati prepared with two kinds of mushrooms.

Tagliatelle with a beef-and-pork ragu at Rossoblu in Downtown.
Tagliatelle with a beef-and-pork ragu at Rossoblu in Downtown.
Rossoblu

Cento Pasta Bar

This former pop-up, which ran for several years as a lunch residency at Downtown’s Mignon, landed a brick-and-mortar location with generous outdoor seating in West Adams in 2021. Pasta preparations include spaghetti topped with a generous dollop of burrata and golden slabs of Santa Barbara sea urchin, as well as linguini bathed in sweet corn carbonara.

A trio of pastas at Cento Pasta Bar in West Adams.
A trio of pastas at Cento Pasta Bar in West Adams.
Cento Pasta Bar

Pasta Sisters

Whether they’re in the mood to hop behind the stove or just simply reheat, Pasta Sisters has noodle lovers covered. Freshly made spaghetti, tagliatelle, pappardelle, and lasagna sheets are available for sale, along with composed dishes like pasta with bottarga and pasta with porcini mushrooms.

Porcini mushroom tagliatelle at Pasta Sisters.
Porcini mushroom tagliatelle at Pasta Sisters.
Matthew Kang

Related Maps

Sunday Gravy

Straightforward and satisfying Italian American fare is the specialty at Sunday Gravy. This brother-and-sister operation prepares the genre’s greatest hits like cheesy garlic bread, bread pudding topped with Nancy Silverton’s gelato, and a hearty bolognese made with locally prepared pasta for lunch and dinner.  

La Parolaccia

It’s all about Roman classics at La Parolaccia in Long Beach. While the pizzas and starters are done right, it’s the mother pastas like amatriciana, carbonara, and cacio e pepe that deserve diners’ full attention. Bring a large group and share them all.

A bowl of carbonara in a yellow and white bowl at La Parolaccia.
A bowl of carbonara at La Parolaccia.
Brian Addison

Related Maps