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Australian wagyu tomahawk from La Boucherie in Downtown LA on a plate.
Australian wagyu tomahawk from La Boucherie in Downtown LA.
La Boucherie

18 Feast-Worthy Steakhouses in Los Angeles

Look no further for properly cooked meat, satisfying sides, and well-made drinks

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Australian wagyu tomahawk from La Boucherie in Downtown LA.
| La Boucherie

Richly marbled and perfectly cooked steaks are one of life's greatest carnivorous pleasures. Thankfully, Los Angeles has no shortage of world-class steakhouses, with top-tier restaurants serving fantastic cocktails and solid sides in addition to all that red meat. From classic chophouses to modern palaces of beef, here now are 18 feast-worthy steakhouses in Los Angeles, presented geographically from west to east.

Added: AB Steak, La Boucherie, W Brazilian Steakhouse, American Beauty

Removed: Mun Korean Steakhouse, Lucky’s Malibu, Bull and Butterfly, M Grill

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Golden Bull Restaurant

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Santa Monica’s enduring Golden Bull still serves stellar chops in an old-school dining room, complete with stiff drinks and friendly service. The prime rib roast is great here as well.

Golden Bull steak with fries.
Golden Bull
Golden Bull [Official Photo]

Fia Steak

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Michael Greco and chef Brendan Collins carved out an exclusive-feeling steakhouse from Fia’s former lounge and private dining space, with a clubby look donned with celebrity photographs. The steaks are impressive, dry-aged in-house and served with a nice sear from a wood grill. The lobster risotto is a fantastic non-beef course.

Dry-aged bistecca from Fia Steak in Santa Monica in a metal pan.
Steak from Fia Steak
Wonho Frank Lee/Eater LA

American Beauty

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American Beauty has become a busy Westside option for steak lovers, thanks in part to the Rose Avenue restaurant’s ample outdoor seating and striking mid-century look. Stop in for cocktails, dry-aged porterhouses to share, and other rich options like glazed baby back ribs or grilled lamb chops.

Wooden tables and chairs in a dim steakhouse room.
Inside American Beauty in Venice.
Wonho Frank Lee

Del Frisco's Double Eagle Steakhouse

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Located in the Westfield Century City mall, this latest restaurant from the Del Frisco’s team serves up hand-cut steaks, seafood, and more than 2,000 wines. Weighing in at 32 ounces and dry-aged for 45-days, “The Double Eagle,” a double bone prime ribeye, is fit for two and worthy of a splurge. One of the top places for lovers of dry-aged beef in LA.

Steak from Del Frisco’s Double Eagle steakhouse on a plate.
Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steakhouse
[Official Photo]

Dear John's

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Dear John’s is a collaborative effort between two already famous Los Angeles chefs: Hans Rockenwagner and Josiah Citrin. The two are turning the place back in time with bright red tablecloths, dark booths, and dishes with a classical edge. There’s a punchy shrimp cocktail and a rich chicken parm on offer, plus cocktails like martinis and manhattans for all to enjoy. In short, Dear John’s is back, and may indeed be better than ever. Though the place is slated to close at some point due to redevelopment of the building, Dear John’s continues to serve until further notice.

A seared steak with asparagus and sauce on the side.
Dear John’s
Wonho Frank Lee

The Arthur J

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This mid-century modern steakhouse from Manhattan Beach restauranteurs Mike Simms, Chris Simms, and chef David LeFevre relies on a white oak grill to deliver delectable steaks to the South Bay. Meaty options fall into two primary categories — USDA prime and certified Angus — though one can also score deluxe Japanese wagyu beef rib-eye cap.

The Grill on the Alley

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This Beverly Hills classic does the simple things well, from a massive wedge salad laden with blue cheese and bacon to a textbook chicken pot pie. When it comes to steak, go for the prized ribeye aged for 28 days and grilled over oak for a seared finish. Save room for the fudge brownie pie or key lime pie for dessert.

Grill on the Alley
Tables at the Grill on the Alley in Beverly Hills.
Wonho Frank Lee

CUT by Wolfgang Puck

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Wolfgang Puck has had his finger on the pulse of luxury for more than three decades, and CUT is his minimalist masterpiece, with new chef Drew Rosenberg now leading the kitchen. Puck’s original steakhouse, located in the back of the Beverly Wilshire hotel, features an exhibition kitchen, wood tables without tablecloths, and art-lined white walls. No matter the source or cut, all of the meat is grilled over hard charcoal and finished in a 1200-degree broiler.

Tomahawk steak with mac and cheese at CUT on a wood board.
Tomahawk steak with mac and cheese at CUT.
CUT

While this Beverly Hills restaurant has steak, Matū doesn’t like to be limited to being called a steakhouse. Most people order the $85 per person set menu with five courses, featuring grilled New Zealand wagyu from First Light farms as well as a daily-changing set of sides and salads. There’s also a more modest three-course tasting for $72. The environs are sleek and modern, making it a low-key place to have seared beef in Beverly Hills.

Sliced New Zealand wagyu steak from Matū.
Sliced New Zealand wagyu steak from Matū.
Matū

ABSteak by Chef Akira Back

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Akira Back reopened his Korean barbecue spot as less of a steakhouse and more of a classic KBBQ with banchan, traditional Korean starters, and even spicy tofu jjigae. The meat quality, often prime grade or wagyu, and sometimes even house dry-aged, is among the best in the city right now.

Cuts of beef at ABSteak ready to be grilled.
Raw cuts from ABSteak,
ABSteak Los Angeles

Carlitos Gardel Restaurant

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Carlitos Gardel features Argentinian-grilled USDA prime steaks at prices that are exceptionally reasonable. Opt for the parrillada plate as a first-timer, since it comes with skirt steak, short ribs, sausages, and sweetbreads for a sampling of all that’s grilled and glorious. And don’t forget the chimichurri.

For the full (stuffed, really) experience: Carlitos Gardel.
Carlitos Gardel on Melrose Avenue
Farley Elliott

Chi Spacca

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This Italian-style steakhouse remains a destination for the bistecca fiorentina, a 50-ounce dry-aged prime porterhouse. For those feeling skittish, there’s the costata alla fiorentina, a prime dry-aged, bone-in New York steak that registers only 36 ounces.

Chi Spacca High Res 2
Chi Spacca bistecca alla fiorentina
Nick Solares

Part butcher shop and part restaurant, Gwen is Curtis and Luke Stone’s fiery temple for all things meaty in Hollywood. The upscale steakhouse has more of a fine-dining feel with dishes like grilled octopus and mushroom tortellini leading into dry-aged cuts that are butchered on the premises.

Sliced steak served on plates with sides.
Steak and sides from Gwen in Hollywood.
Gwen

Daedo Sikdang

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Seoul import Daedo has basically one type of meat for most tables: prime-grade ribeye steak cut into three separate pieces then grilled over a cast iron skillet. Served with a fairly basic set of banchan and some flavorful dipping sauces, this is what happens with steakhouse meets KBBQ in LA.

Grilling ribeye at Daedo Sikdang in LA’s Koreatown.
Grilled ribeye at Daedo Sikdang.
Wonho Frank Lee

W Brazilian Steakhouse

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Koreatown’s tiniest little steakhouse serves a powerful punch of Brazilian flavors, with wonderfully grilled picanha and other traditional meats sliced at the table from skewers. The AYCE situation comes with all the sides too, but served in a cart instead of at a buffet. Make sure to get there early as the space has around 20 seats.

A vertical skewer of grilled meat at a new steakhouse.
Picanha from W Brazilian Steakhouse in Koreatown.
Matthew Kang

Taylor's Prime Steak House

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The Taylor family started the restaurant in 1953 and has been anchored to the same Koreatown location since 1970. People slide into black and red booths and disappear into times past with help from martinis and high-value steaks. Taylor’s prepares dry-aged, prime beef in a 700-degree gas broiler, including the culotte, a three-inch thick, center-cut top sirloin. Prime sirloin pepper steak is another popular choice for anyone looking for less heft and a different flavor profile.

Taylor’s Steakhouse
Taylor’s Steakhouse

La Boucherie

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Downtown’s towering La Boucherie is back in business after a long pandemic hiatus. With incredible, nearly unfettered views of the city below, and well-grilled chops, La Boucherie is probably a bit more ambience than pure food experience. But the meat quality is excellent and some of the starters, like the crispy jumbo lump crap, are must-orders.

T-bone steak on a white platter.
T-bone steak from La Boucherie in Downtown LA.
La Boucherie

Dal Rae Restaurant

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Brothers Kevin and Lorin Smith own this Pico Rivera institution, which their father and uncle founded in 1958 and named for racehorse Sir Dal Rae. The restaurant houses big black leather booths, umbrella-shaped lanterns, and wood and mirrored walls. Still, Dal Rae is more than just a time capsule. Beef remains in high demand, particularly the pepper steak. Whether it’s filet mignon or prime New York, both cuts are lavished with spicy pepper sauce.

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Golden Bull Restaurant

Golden Bull steak with fries.
Golden Bull
Golden Bull [Official Photo]

Santa Monica’s enduring Golden Bull still serves stellar chops in an old-school dining room, complete with stiff drinks and friendly service. The prime rib roast is great here as well.

Golden Bull steak with fries.
Golden Bull
Golden Bull [Official Photo]

Fia Steak

Dry-aged bistecca from Fia Steak in Santa Monica in a metal pan.
Steak from Fia Steak
Wonho Frank Lee/Eater LA

Michael Greco and chef Brendan Collins carved out an exclusive-feeling steakhouse from Fia’s former lounge and private dining space, with a clubby look donned with celebrity photographs. The steaks are impressive, dry-aged in-house and served with a nice sear from a wood grill. The lobster risotto is a fantastic non-beef course.

Dry-aged bistecca from Fia Steak in Santa Monica in a metal pan.
Steak from Fia Steak
Wonho Frank Lee/Eater LA

American Beauty

Wooden tables and chairs in a dim steakhouse room.
Inside American Beauty in Venice.
Wonho Frank Lee

American Beauty has become a busy Westside option for steak lovers, thanks in part to the Rose Avenue restaurant’s ample outdoor seating and striking mid-century look. Stop in for cocktails, dry-aged porterhouses to share, and other rich options like glazed baby back ribs or grilled lamb chops.

Wooden tables and chairs in a dim steakhouse room.
Inside American Beauty in Venice.
Wonho Frank Lee

Del Frisco's Double Eagle Steakhouse

Steak from Del Frisco’s Double Eagle steakhouse on a plate.
Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steakhouse
[Official Photo]

Located in the Westfield Century City mall, this latest restaurant from the Del Frisco’s team serves up hand-cut steaks, seafood, and more than 2,000 wines. Weighing in at 32 ounces and dry-aged for 45-days, “The Double Eagle,” a double bone prime ribeye, is fit for two and worthy of a splurge. One of the top places for lovers of dry-aged beef in LA.

Steak from Del Frisco’s Double Eagle steakhouse on a plate.
Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steakhouse
[Official Photo]

Dear John's

A seared steak with asparagus and sauce on the side.
Dear John’s
Wonho Frank Lee

Dear John’s is a collaborative effort between two already famous Los Angeles chefs: Hans Rockenwagner and Josiah Citrin. The two are turning the place back in time with bright red tablecloths, dark booths, and dishes with a classical edge. There’s a punchy shrimp cocktail and a rich chicken parm on offer, plus cocktails like martinis and manhattans for all to enjoy. In short, Dear John’s is back, and may indeed be better than ever. Though the place is slated to close at some point due to redevelopment of the building, Dear John’s continues to serve until further notice.

A seared steak with asparagus and sauce on the side.
Dear John’s
Wonho Frank Lee

The Arthur J

This mid-century modern steakhouse from Manhattan Beach restauranteurs Mike Simms, Chris Simms, and chef David LeFevre relies on a white oak grill to deliver delectable steaks to the South Bay. Meaty options fall into two primary categories — USDA prime and certified Angus — though one can also score deluxe Japanese wagyu beef rib-eye cap.

The Grill on the Alley

Grill on the Alley
Tables at the Grill on the Alley in Beverly Hills.
Wonho Frank Lee

This Beverly Hills classic does the simple things well, from a massive wedge salad laden with blue cheese and bacon to a textbook chicken pot pie. When it comes to steak, go for the prized ribeye aged for 28 days and grilled over oak for a seared finish. Save room for the fudge brownie pie or key lime pie for dessert.

Grill on the Alley
Tables at the Grill on the Alley in Beverly Hills.
Wonho Frank Lee

CUT by Wolfgang Puck

Tomahawk steak with mac and cheese at CUT on a wood board.
Tomahawk steak with mac and cheese at CUT.
CUT

Wolfgang Puck has had his finger on the pulse of luxury for more than three decades, and CUT is his minimalist masterpiece, with new chef Drew Rosenberg now leading the kitchen. Puck’s original steakhouse, located in the back of the Beverly Wilshire hotel, features an exhibition kitchen, wood tables without tablecloths, and art-lined white walls. No matter the source or cut, all of the meat is grilled over hard charcoal and finished in a 1200-degree broiler.

Tomahawk steak with mac and cheese at CUT on a wood board.
Tomahawk steak with mac and cheese at CUT.
CUT

Matū

Sliced New Zealand wagyu steak from Matū.
Sliced New Zealand wagyu steak from Matū.
Matū

While this Beverly Hills restaurant has steak, Matū doesn’t like to be limited to being called a steakhouse. Most people order the $85 per person set menu with five courses, featuring grilled New Zealand wagyu from First Light farms as well as a daily-changing set of sides and salads. There’s also a more modest three-course tasting for $72. The environs are sleek and modern, making it a low-key place to have seared beef in Beverly Hills.

Sliced New Zealand wagyu steak from Matū.
Sliced New Zealand wagyu steak from Matū.
Matū

ABSteak by Chef Akira Back

Cuts of beef at ABSteak ready to be grilled.
Raw cuts from ABSteak,
ABSteak Los Angeles

Akira Back reopened his Korean barbecue spot as less of a steakhouse and more of a classic KBBQ with banchan, traditional Korean starters, and even spicy tofu jjigae. The meat quality, often prime grade or wagyu, and sometimes even house dry-aged, is among the best in the city right now.

Cuts of beef at ABSteak ready to be grilled.
Raw cuts from ABSteak,
ABSteak Los Angeles

Carlitos Gardel Restaurant

For the full (stuffed, really) experience: Carlitos Gardel.
Carlitos Gardel on Melrose Avenue
Farley Elliott

Carlitos Gardel features Argentinian-grilled USDA prime steaks at prices that are exceptionally reasonable. Opt for the parrillada plate as a first-timer, since it comes with skirt steak, short ribs, sausages, and sweetbreads for a sampling of all that’s grilled and glorious. And don’t forget the chimichurri.

For the full (stuffed, really) experience: Carlitos Gardel.
Carlitos Gardel on Melrose Avenue
Farley Elliott

Chi Spacca

Chi Spacca High Res 2
Chi Spacca bistecca alla fiorentina
Nick Solares

This Italian-style steakhouse remains a destination for the bistecca fiorentina, a 50-ounce dry-aged prime porterhouse. For those feeling skittish, there’s the costata alla fiorentina, a prime dry-aged, bone-in New York steak that registers only 36 ounces.