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Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter.
Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter
Matthew Kang

14 Essential Omakase Feasts in Los Angeles

The best chef-selected tasting menus of sashimi and nigiri

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Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter
| Matthew Kang

Omakase. It’s a welcome phrase in any city, especially Los Angeles. When “trusting the chef” to create a tasting menu, it places diners into the hands of skilled personnel with carefully selected ingredients. It’s beautiful.

While omakase can be utilized for any cuisine, this map emphasizes LA’s bounty of Japanese restaurants. LA is blessed upon high with some of the freshest fish in the country, but that doesn’t mean that all Japanese omakase serves nigiri. It’s also a joy to watch these crafted courses come together, whether sashimi or oysters. Here now, are 14 restaurants where chefs carefully select and prepare every morsel that goes onto a curated plate.

Removed: Shibumi, Inn Ann

Added: Morihiro, Kaneyoshi, Brothers Sushi, Masakazu, Sushi Tama, Sushi Hide

The latest CDC guidance for vaccinated diners during the COVID-19 outbreak is here; dining out still carries risks for unvaccinated diners and workers. Please be aware of changing local rules, and check individual restaurant websites for any additional restrictions such as mask requirements. Find a local vaccination site here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. The Brothers Sushi

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21418 Ventura Blvd
Woodland Hills, CA 91364
(818) 456-4509
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Chef Mark Okuda has a wide-ranging sushi restaurant in Woodland Hills with outdoor patio, indoor dining, and a tight counter, where he and the team serve an upscale omakase with multiple prepared dishes followed by a parade of stellar sushi that runs $180.

Otoro nigiri by chef Mark Okuda at Brothers Sushi in Woodland Hills, served on a slate.
Brothers Sushi
Matthew Kang

2. Shin Sushi

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16573 Ventura Blvd
Encino, CA 91436
(818) 616-4148

A recent one-star Michelin recipient, Shin Sushi’s omakase is the stuff of legends. Chef Take-san is particular about serving fish that is in season, and enjoys friendly chats about subjects outside of food.

Shin Sushi Shin Sushi

3. Sushi Note

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13447 Ventura Blvd
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
(818) 802-3443
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Sherman Oak’s Sushi Note straddles the line between wine bar and sushi destination. Owners David Gibbs and Andy Paxson recruited the chef from Encino’s former 4 On 6 sushi bar, and chef Kiminobu Saito lovingly prepares omakase at the seven-seat bar. The “whole note” omakase runs a mere $115, with a wine pairing coming in a $75 that comes with six glasses.

Salmon sushi at the sushi bar.
Sushi Note
Cathy Chaplin

4. Morihiro

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3133 Glendale Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90039
(323) 522-3993
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Morihiro Onodera’s comeback to the LA sushi scene is more than welcome, with an Atwater Village restaurant that fully emcompasses the chef’s multiple passions of incredible fish, hand thrown ceramic, and stellar rice. The omakase at the counter is the one to pick, though the price will be close to $400 for the complete experience.

Japanese bowls hold fine foods during daylight hours atop a wooden table.
Morihiro
Morihiro

5. Sushi Ginza Onodera

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609 La Cienega Blvd
West Hollywood, CA 90069
(323) 433-4817
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With two Michelin stars for Sushi Ginza Onodera, the three-year-old restaurant’s profile rose considerably. Though the acknowledgement is a welcome one, the $400 seasonal omakase is the result of fresh fish flown in twice a week from Japan.

Sushi Ginza Onodera chef Yohei Matsuki
Sushi Ginza Onodera chef Yohei Matsuki
Courtesy of MST Creative PR

6. Sushi Tama

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116 N Robertson Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90048
(424) 249-3009
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Though this chic West Hollywood-area sushi restaurant offered reasonably priced nigiri for takeout, the game is now fully about enjoying chef HYoshimoto’s omakase at the counter. There’s no fixed price on the omakase, but expect the former Tsukiji chef to charge a healthy $100-200 for the complete experience.

7. Nozawa Bar

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212 N Canon Dr
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
(424) 216-6158
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The intimate Nozawa Bar’s was designated with one Michelin star this year. Though it sits behind Sugarfish in Beverly Hills, this 10-seat sushi temple is one of the purest expressions of omakase in LA, with fish flown in regularly from Japan and upwards of 20 courses prepared right in front of you. The $195 per person price is modest compared to the incredible quality here.

Nozawa Bar chef serves plate of sashimi in Beverly Hills.
Nozawa Bar
Matthew Kang

8. Sushi Hide

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123 Astronaut Ellison S Onizuka St #307
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 613-0083
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Serving an immense list of incredible fish sourced from Japan, this hideaway in Little Tokyo could be one of the most surprising new omakase destinations in Los Angeles. Prices are high to match the dinner, but Hide Sushi is a reminder that LA’s sushi scene could be unrivaled in the United States.

9. Sushi Kaneyoshi

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250 E 1st St B1
Los Angeles, CA 90012
(213) 277-2388
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LA’s highest tier of omakase restaurants is already looking crowded, with the likes of Ginza Onodera, Q, Morihiro, Nozawa Bar, and Hayato pushing $300 (after tax and tip but before drinks) or more for the highest quality of fish. Kaneyoshi is the newest entrant, with a truly rarefied sushi dinner from chef Yoshiyuki starting at $250.

Jewelrybox chirashi from Kaneyoshi
Kaneyoshi
Kaneyoshi

10. Masakazu

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1911 Westwood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90025
(310) 421-9779

This low-key Westwood sushi restaurant has more modestly priced omakase that starts at under $150, but doesn’t skimp in terms of quality and service. There’s something incredibly refreshing about a sleeper find like Masakazu.

521 W 7th St
Los Angeles, CA 90017
(213) 225-6285
Visit Website

Tokyo-native Hiroyuki Naruke’s high-end Downtown restaurant opened in 2013, and the prices are fairly hefty. But Naruke’s reputation precedes him, so the $250 tasting menu requires 48 hours advanced notice. His staying power is proof that skill and consistency works. The Michelin Guide agreed by granting Q one star.

12. Hayato

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1320 E 7th St #126
Los Angeles, CA 90021
(213) 395-0607
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Chef Brandon Go’s extravagant omakase only seats eight people a night, which the Los Angeles Times critic Bill Addison describes as “the next world-class destination for top-tier dining in Los Angeles.” The price is well over $250 per person, with reservations required weeks or even more in advance. Hayato received a Michelin star in 2019.

13. n/naka

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3455 Overland Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90034
(310) 836-6252
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As one of LA’s most beloved restaurants, Niki Nakayama and Carole Iida’s n/naka can be one of the city’s most difficult to secure reservations. The Westside restaurant scored two Michelin stars this year, thanks to a simple and effective format: a modern kaiseki menu with multiple courses, or a vegetarian tasting. Both can be paired with wine.

Amuse bouches at n/naka, Los Angeles
n/naka
Wonho Frank Lee

14. Sushi Inaba Manhattan Beach

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1300 Highland Ave #107
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266

Evoking a feeling of Tokyo, Sushi Inaba’s tiny interior only fits six people. It’s an intimate spot where chef Yasu Hirano prepares lunch and dinner with fish sourced directly from Japan rather than through distributors. Lunchtime is a bargain compared to dinner, where prices can grow up well over $200 for the top-tier omakase.

Sushi from Sushi Inaba
Sushi Inaba
Sushi Inaba website

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1. The Brothers Sushi

21418 Ventura Blvd, Woodland Hills, CA 91364
Otoro nigiri by chef Mark Okuda at Brothers Sushi in Woodland Hills, served on a slate.
Brothers Sushi
Matthew Kang

Chef Mark Okuda has a wide-ranging sushi restaurant in Woodland Hills with outdoor patio, indoor dining, and a tight counter, where he and the team serve an upscale omakase with multiple prepared dishes followed by a parade of stellar sushi that runs $180.

21418 Ventura Blvd
Woodland Hills, CA 91364

2. Shin Sushi

16573 Ventura Blvd, Encino, CA 91436
Shin Sushi Shin Sushi

A recent one-star Michelin recipient, Shin Sushi’s omakase is the stuff of legends. Chef Take-san is particular about serving fish that is in season, and enjoys friendly chats about subjects outside of food.

16573 Ventura Blvd
Encino, CA 91436

3. Sushi Note

13447 Ventura Blvd, Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
Salmon sushi at the sushi bar.
Sushi Note
Cathy Chaplin

Sherman Oak’s Sushi Note straddles the line between wine bar and sushi destination. Owners David Gibbs and Andy Paxson recruited the chef from Encino’s former 4 On 6 sushi bar, and chef Kiminobu Saito lovingly prepares omakase at the seven-seat bar. The “whole note” omakase runs a mere $115, with a wine pairing coming in a $75 that comes with six glasses.

13447 Ventura Blvd
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

4. Morihiro

3133 Glendale Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90039
Japanese bowls hold fine foods during daylight hours atop a wooden table.
Morihiro
Morihiro

Morihiro Onodera’s comeback to the LA sushi scene is more than welcome, with an Atwater Village restaurant that fully emcompasses the chef’s multiple passions of incredible fish, hand thrown ceramic, and stellar rice. The omakase at the counter is the one to pick, though the price will be close to $400 for the complete experience.

3133 Glendale Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90039

5. Sushi Ginza Onodera

609 La Cienega Blvd, West Hollywood, CA 90069
Sushi Ginza Onodera chef Yohei Matsuki
Sushi Ginza Onodera chef Yohei Matsuki
Courtesy of MST Creative PR

With two Michelin stars for Sushi Ginza Onodera, the three-year-old restaurant’s profile rose considerably. Though the acknowledgement is a welcome one, the $400 seasonal omakase is the result of fresh fish flown in twice a week from Japan.

609 La Cienega Blvd
West Hollywood, CA 90069

6. Sushi Tama

116 N Robertson Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048

Though this chic West Hollywood-area sushi restaurant offered reasonably priced nigiri for takeout, the game is now fully about enjoying chef HYoshimoto’s omakase at the counter. There’s no fixed price on the omakase, but expect the former Tsukiji chef to charge a healthy $100-200 for the complete experience.

116 N Robertson Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90048

7. Nozawa Bar

212 N Canon Dr, Beverly Hills, CA 90210
Nozawa Bar chef serves plate of sashimi in Beverly Hills.
Nozawa Bar
Matthew Kang

The intimate Nozawa Bar’s was designated with one Michelin star this year. Though it sits behind Sugarfish in Beverly Hills, this 10-seat sushi temple is one of the purest expressions of omakase in LA, with fish flown in regularly from Japan and upwards of 20 courses prepared right in front of you. The $195 per person price is modest compared to the incredible quality here.

212 N Canon Dr
Beverly Hills, CA 90210

8. Sushi Hide

123 Astronaut Ellison S Onizuka St #307, Los Angeles, CA 90012

Serving an immense list of incredible fish sourced from Japan, this hideaway in Little Tokyo could be one of the most surprising new omakase destinations in Los Angeles. Prices are high to match the dinner, but Hide Sushi is a reminder that LA’s sushi scene could be unrivaled in the United States.

123 Astronaut Ellison S Onizuka St #307
Los Angeles, CA 90012

9. Sushi Kaneyoshi

250 E 1st St B1, Los Angeles, CA 90012
Jewelrybox chirashi from Kaneyoshi
Kaneyoshi
Kaneyoshi

LA’s highest tier of omakase restaurants is already looking crowded, with the likes of Ginza Onodera, Q, Morihiro, Nozawa Bar, and Hayato pushing $300 (after tax and tip but before drinks) or more for the highest quality of fish. Kaneyoshi is the newest entrant, with a truly rarefied sushi dinner from chef Yoshiyuki starting at $250.

250 E 1st St B1
Los Angeles, CA 90012

10. Masakazu

1911 Westwood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90025

This low-key Westwood sushi restaurant has more modestly priced omakase that starts at under $150, but doesn’t skimp in terms of quality and service. There’s something incredibly refreshing about a sleeper find like Masakazu.

1911 Westwood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90025

11. Q

521 W 7th St, Los Angeles, CA 90017

Tokyo-native Hiroyuki Naruke’s high-end Downtown restaurant opened in 2013, and the prices are fairly hefty. But Naruke’s reputation precedes him, so the $250 tasting menu requires 48 hours advanced notice. His staying power is proof that skill and consistency works. The Michelin Guide agreed by granting Q one star.

521 W 7th St
Los Angeles, CA 90017

12. Hayato

1320 E 7th St #126, Los Angeles, CA 90021

Chef Brandon Go’s extravagant omakase only seats eight people a night, which the Los Angeles Times critic Bill Addison describes as “the next world-class destination for top-tier dining in Los Angeles.” The price is well over $250 per person, with reservations required weeks or even more in advance. Hayato received a Michelin star in 2019.

1320 E 7th St #126
Los Angeles, CA 90021

13. n/naka

3455 Overland Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90034
Amuse bouches at n/naka, Los Angeles
n/naka
Wonho Frank Lee

As one of LA’s most beloved restaurants, Niki Nakayama and Carole Iida’s n/naka can be one of the city’s most difficult to secure reservations. The Westside restaurant scored two Michelin stars this year, thanks to a simple and effective format: a modern kaiseki menu with multiple courses, or a vegetarian tasting. Both can be paired with wine.

3455 Overland Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90034

14. Sushi Inaba Manhattan Beach

1300 Highland Ave #107, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
Sushi from Sushi Inaba
Sushi Inaba
Sushi Inaba website

Evoking a feeling of Tokyo, Sushi Inaba’s tiny interior only fits six people. It’s an intimate spot where chef Yasu Hirano prepares lunch and dinner with fish sourced directly from Japan rather than through distributors. Lunchtime is a bargain compared to dinner, where prices can grow up well over $200 for the top-tier omakase.

1300 Highland Ave #107
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266

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