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11 Essential Sushi Restaurants in the San Fernando Valley

Move over Little Tokyo, the SFV is sushi central

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Sushi is serious business in Los Angeles, and finding a favorite spot is an easy task. The choices are abundant, as some head to Little Tokyo for the unfussy and unmatched Sushi Gen. Others take a trek to the flagship location of Matsuhisa, for what is still considered some of the best sushi in the city. The city also overflows with stylish, and glitzy options, complete with celebrities chewing on pickled ginger between omakase courses. Yet the San Fernando Valley offers outstanding sushi that rivals LA in quality, casual atmosphere, price, and infinitely better parking.

Update: as of April 2, 2018, Nakamura has closed. It’s been removed from the list.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Asanebo

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Chef Tetsuya Nakao has been in the Los Angeles sushi game since 1982. As one of the original chefs that helped start the original Matsuhisa, chef Nakao creates sophisticated omakase with mindful service.

Asanebo
Matt W. on Yelp

Katsu-ya

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The minimalist style of Katsu-Ya Studio City is a stark difference between the pomp and celebrity of mega-brand, Katsuya By S+ark. This understated location allows chef Katsuya Uechi to focus on the food. As one of four master sushi chefs in Los Angeles, Uechi is a star on either side of the Hollywood Hills. Katsu-Ya has three other Valley locations: Encino, Northridge, and Woodland Hills.

Katsu-Ya sashimi
Katsu-Ya website

Sushi Iki

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Known for Sushi Iki colorful, beautiful sushi in town. Chef Eddie Okamoto provides colorful flowers to complement the fish. Ingredients are not always traditional, with the current addition of Italian black truffles to the Sushi Iki menu.

Sushi Iki’s Tsubugai, Hokkaido sea whelk, topped with fish roe and sauce, with kimo
By Thomas M. on Yelp

Iroha Sushi of Tokyo

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If Iroha Sushi of Tokyo looks like it used to be a house, that’s because it was converted to one many years ago. This neighborhood hangout can get incredibly busy, so heading there for a $16 sashimi combination might be your best bet.

Daiwa Sushi

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Considered a local favorite, Daiwa Sushi is a small spot on a budy stretch of Ventura Blvd in Studio City. As the lines form out of places like Asanebo, simply walk into the quiet, intimate atmosphere of Daiwa, for very straightforward and fresh sushi.

Daiwa Sushi
Daiwa webiste

Okumura Restaurant

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Full of places to shop and dine, Okumura is nestled in the Encino Commons. Be mindful of their limited hours, and chef Ryoto Ukumura can create a beautiful, yet pricey gold-encrusted omakase. Making a classic selection from the very reasonably priced a la carte is welcomed too.

Kazuki Sushi

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Kazuki Sushi is the new kid on the block. Kazuki reworked the former Rainbow Thai space in spring 2017, and boasts an excellent quality-to-price ratio. Kazuki has the makings of what makes a sushi restaurant successful: friendly and attentive service, fresh fish, and enjoyable small plates to help fill any belly.

Kazuki Sushi
Kazuki Sushi’s Yelp

Sushi Yuzu

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The residential and sleepy Toluca Lake is part of the SFV’s sushi scene. Sushi Yuzu’s quality goes beyond the carefully sliced fish, by offering a made-to-order shrimp & scallop dumplings with sweet rice, or the free-range fried chicken appetizer. But the toro tartare includes a heavenly single bite combination: seaweed salad, toro, flying fish egg, pickled wasabi, micro green, and quail egg.

Sushi Yuzu
Google Maps

Go's Mart

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Go’s Mart is a twenty minute drive from the cluster of Japanese restaurants on Ventura Boulevard. And while the storefront “sushi” sign, and decor is unremarkable, the food is anything but. For almost 20 years, the husband and wife team behind Go’s Mart generates some of the freshest, highly decorated, and perfectly sliced sushi in all of Los Angeles.

Go’s Smart

SUGARFISH by sushi nozawa

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This popular chainlet takes over the former Sushi Nozawa, the original Sushi Nazi who commanded the counter here for decades before creating this “fine” casual restaurant. The reasonably priced set menus feature pristine fish and the signature warm, vinegary rice that has plenty of fans (with perhaps a few detractors).

Sugarfish
The Sugarfish website

Sushi|Bar

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Phillip Frankland Lee oversees the exclusive Sushi|Bar placed deep inside the Woodley Proper and Scratch Bar space in Encino. Already one of the most impressive places in the city for a highly curated, specialized omakase experience, the meal consists of 17 courses at a price of $110. Reservations can only be made on site on the same day, or online via Tock.

Matthew Kang

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Asanebo

Asanebo
Matt W. on Yelp

Chef Tetsuya Nakao has been in the Los Angeles sushi game since 1982. As one of the original chefs that helped start the original Matsuhisa, chef Nakao creates sophisticated omakase with mindful service.

Asanebo
Matt W. on Yelp

Katsu-ya

Katsu-Ya sashimi
Katsu-Ya website

The minimalist style of Katsu-Ya Studio City is a stark difference between the pomp and celebrity of mega-brand, Katsuya By S+ark. This understated location allows chef Katsuya Uechi to focus on the food. As one of four master sushi chefs in Los Angeles, Uechi is a star on either side of the Hollywood Hills. Katsu-Ya has three other Valley locations: Encino, Northridge, and Woodland Hills.

Katsu-Ya sashimi
Katsu-Ya website

Sushi Iki

Sushi Iki’s Tsubugai, Hokkaido sea whelk, topped with fish roe and sauce, with kimo
By Thomas M. on Yelp

Known for Sushi Iki colorful, beautiful sushi in town. Chef Eddie Okamoto provides colorful flowers to complement the fish. Ingredients are not always traditional, with the current addition of Italian black truffles to the Sushi Iki menu.

Sushi Iki’s Tsubugai, Hokkaido sea whelk, topped with fish roe and sauce, with kimo
By Thomas M. on Yelp

Iroha Sushi of Tokyo

If Iroha Sushi of Tokyo looks like it used to be a house, that’s because it was converted to one many years ago. This neighborhood hangout can get incredibly busy, so heading there for a $16 sashimi combination might be your best bet.

Daiwa Sushi

Daiwa Sushi
Daiwa webiste

Considered a local favorite, Daiwa Sushi is a small spot on a budy stretch of Ventura Blvd in Studio City. As the lines form out of places like Asanebo, simply walk into the quiet, intimate atmosphere of Daiwa, for very straightforward and fresh sushi.

Daiwa Sushi
Daiwa webiste

Okumura Restaurant

Full of places to shop and dine, Okumura is nestled in the Encino Commons. Be mindful of their limited hours, and chef Ryoto Ukumura can create a beautiful, yet pricey gold-encrusted omakase. Making a classic selection from the very reasonably priced a la carte is welcomed too.

Kazuki Sushi

Kazuki Sushi
Kazuki Sushi’s Yelp

Kazuki Sushi is the new kid on the block. Kazuki reworked the former Rainbow Thai space in spring 2017, and boasts an excellent quality-to-price ratio. Kazuki has the makings of what makes a sushi restaurant successful: friendly and attentive service, fresh fish, and enjoyable small plates to help fill any belly.

Kazuki Sushi
Kazuki Sushi’s Yelp

Sushi Yuzu

Sushi Yuzu
Google Maps

The residential and sleepy Toluca Lake is part of the SFV’s sushi scene. Sushi Yuzu’s quality goes beyond the carefully sliced fish, by offering a made-to-order shrimp & scallop dumplings with sweet rice, or the free-range fried chicken appetizer. But the toro tartare includes a heavenly single bite combination: seaweed salad, toro, flying fish egg, pickled wasabi, micro green, and quail egg.

Sushi Yuzu
Google Maps

Go's Mart

Go’s Smart

Go’s Mart is a twenty minute drive from the cluster of Japanese restaurants on Ventura Boulevard. And while the storefront “sushi” sign, and decor is unremarkable, the food is anything but. For almost 20 years, the husband and wife team behind Go’s Mart generates some of the freshest, highly decorated, and perfectly sliced sushi in all of Los Angeles.

Go’s Smart

SUGARFISH by sushi nozawa

Sugarfish
The Sugarfish website

This popular chainlet takes over the former Sushi Nozawa, the original Sushi Nazi who commanded the counter here for decades before creating this “fine” casual restaurant. The reasonably priced set menus feature pristine fish and the signature warm, vinegary rice that has plenty of fans (with perhaps a few detractors).

Sugarfish
The Sugarfish website

Sushi|Bar

Matthew Kang

Phillip Frankland Lee oversees the exclusive Sushi|Bar placed deep inside the Woodley Proper and Scratch Bar space in Encino. Already one of the most impressive places in the city for a highly curated, specialized omakase experience, the meal consists of 17 courses at a price of $110. Reservations can only be made on site on the same day, or online via Tock.

Matthew Kang

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