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Caramelized pork and eggs with pickled mustard greens and steamed rice.
Caramelized pork and eggs from Bé Ù in East Hollywood.
Wonho Frank Lee

20 Vibrant Vietnamese Restaurants to Try in Los Angeles

Banh mi, noodle soups, baked catfish, and more

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Caramelized pork and eggs from Bé Ù in East Hollywood.
| Wonho Frank Lee

Vietnamese restaurants across LA are open and ready to comfort Angelenos once again with steaming bowls of pho, generously stuffed banh mi, and herb-filled spring rolls. While Orange County’s Little Saigon is the epicenter Vietnamese food in Southern California, LA has its own destinations. From My Lai in Mar Vista to Vinh Loi Tofu in Reseda and Pho Ngoon in San Gabriel, here now are 20 fabulous Vietnamese restaurants to try in Los Angeles.

Removed: Tip Top Sandwich, Hue Thai Bakery & Deli, Thien An Bo 7 Mon, Pho Hai Kieu, Five Stars Hue

Added: Bé Ù, My Lai, Pho 87, Thien Huong Restaurant

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Vinh Loi Tofu

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Owner and chef Kevin Tran makes fresh tofu each day for his savory and sweet vegan fare. The Iron Man pho satisfies, while the warm and sweet ginger tofu “pudding” comes through for dessert. Open for takeout and delivery in Reseda and Cerritos.

Shad Davis and Traci Phan Davis’s fast-casual My Lai serves Vietnamese build-your-own bowls, light bites like spring rolls and fried tofu, and composed dishes inspired by family recipes including chicken with garlic rice. 

Pho Hue Oi

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With locations in Little Saigon and Redondo Beach, Pho Hue Oi is a favorite of Eater’s editor Matthew Kang. He always orders the house-special pho and garlic shrimp noodles.

Pho Saigon Pearl

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Pho Saigon Pearl is a haven for dependable Vietnamese dishes including spring rolls, banh mi sandwiches, soups, and noodle bowls. The restaurant is open daily from noon to 9 p.m. for dine-in, takeout, and delivery.

Bé Ù serves Vietnamese comfort and street foods at affordable prices. The restaurant’s chef and owner Uyên Lê takes great pride in every dish on the menu, but is particularly fond of the banh mi. The sandwiches come stuffed with lemongrass-scented chicken, pork, and beef. Order Lê’s favorite vegan banh mi filled with tofu and pate. 

A banh mi sandwich made on a baguette and filled with lemongrass beef, pickled vegetables, cucumber, and jalapeno.
A banh mi sandwich at Bé Ù in East Hollywood.
Wonho Frank Lee

Viet Noodle Bar

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Chef Viet Tran takes classic Vietnamese fare to hipper and healthier pastures at his Atwater Village restaurant. The young jackfruit salad makes for a satisfying meatless starter, while the turmeric white fish noodles with dill keep the crowds coming back time and again. Open for dine-in, takeout, and delivery.

Thien Huong Restaurant

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Find Thien Huong Restaurant tucked into the ground floor of Far East Plaza in Chinatown. The extensive menu runs the gamut, but regulars can’t resist the pho ga (chicken noodle soup) and the bun bo Hue (Hue-style beef and lemongrass noodle soup).

Phở 87

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LA’s historic Chinatown plays host to some of the city’s finest Vietnamese cooking. Phở 87’s winding menu includes dozens of iterations of Vietnam’s iconic beef noodle soup, but the one to order is the pho dac biet that includes a bit of every beefy cut like brisket, tendon, flank, and tripe.

Nem Nuong Khanh Hoa

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Vietnamese meatballs (nem) are a curiously loud bunch that snap at first bite and squeak at first chew. Here, grilled pork meatballs and skewers are served on grand platters along with rice papers for wrapping and a forest of greens for garnishing.

Nha Trang Noodle House Restaurant

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The menu at Nha Trang is refreshingly pared down with only eight dishes to choose from. On the menu is pho and a few banh mi, but the specialty are noodle soups from central Vietnam. The bun bo Hue is one of the better versions to be had on this side of the Pacific.

<span data-author="2715">Nha Trang Noodle House Restaurant </span>
Nha Trang Noodle House Restaurant
GastronomyBlog

Golden Deli Vietnamese Restaurant

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Find southern-style Vietnamese food at this perpetually busy, efficiently run, and solid-as-can-be restaurant. Come for the blistered cha gio stuffed with ground pork and woodear mushrooms, and stay for a bowl of pho, a platter of broken rice, or cool vermicelli noodles.

Broken rice from Golden Deli in San Gabriel.
Golden Deli Vietnamese Restaurant
Cathy Chaplin

Com Tam Thuan Kieu Restaurant

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Broken rice served with a plethora of proteins is what it’s all about at this long-standing restaurant. Toppings include shredded pork dusted in roasted rice powder, pork meatloaf, grilled shrimp paste, grilled pork, and more. Make sure to get a fried egg to top it all off.

Hien Khanh

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Hidden away in the food court of Rosemead’s Square Supermarket lies Hien Khanh, a Little Saigon import that makes the very best Vietnamese desserts in town. Those unfamiliar with the genre may be a bit wary upon seeing legumes, seaweed, and root vegetables swimming in a sea of coconut milk, but there’s no need to hesitate because everything tastes stupendous.

Hien Khanh
Hien Khanh
GastronomyBlog

Pho Ngoon

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The specialty here is Northern Vietnam’s greatest hits. The bun cha, the region’s quintessential dish, comes with charbroiled pork patties and pork belly soaking in fish sauce. An order of the nem cua be, beautifully blistered crab and pork egg rolls, is an absolute must.

Pho Ngoon
Pho Ngoon
GastronomyBlog

Pho Ga District

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It’s hard to find a bowl of chicken pho better than the ones made by Phan Tran at Pho Ga District. The bun mang vit, noodle soup with duck and bamboo shoots, is stellar as well.

Bun mang vit, duck and bamboo noodle soup with herbs and sauce at Pho Ga
Pho Ga District
Wonho Frank Lee

Sáu Can Tho Vietnamese Kitchen

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The signature dish at Sáu Can Tho is baked catfish (ca dut lo hau giang). The fish’s prized crispy skin, charred in some spots and golden throughout, gives way to moist and tender flesh imbued with honey and turmeric. Served on the side are herbs and lettuce, pickled carrots and daikon, cucumber spears, vermicelli rice noodles, rice papers, and best of all, a tangy-sweet tamarind dipping sauce. Call ahead to reserve the catfish to avoid a long wait.

Sáu Can Tho Vietnamese Kitchen
Sáu Can Tho Vietnamese Kitchen
GastronomyBlog

Banh Xeo Quan

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Banh Xeo Quan, also known as Mr. Rice, specializes in Vietnamese crepes. Owner Phi Tran opened the restaurant to bring this southern Vietnamese specialty to the San Gabriel Valley. Banh xeo, which literally means “sizzling cake,” earned its name from the sound the batter makes when it hits the scorching pan. The result is a thin crepe that’s crisp and delicate throughout with lacy, caramelized edges. Stuffed inside bean sprouts, mushrooms, shrimp, and pork. Go ahead and upgrade to the banh xeo dac biet for extra filling.

Banh Xeo Quan
Banh Xeo Quan
@GastronomyBlog

Pho Filet

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Linh Phuong Nguyen makes one of the city’s best bowls of southern-style pho at this worn-in restaurant straddling the border between Rosemead and South El Monte. While the filet mignon that comes standard with every bowl is a cut above the rest, it’s Nguyen’s unparalleled broth that distinguishes her product from the dozens of pho hawkers in town.

A steaming bowl of beef pho at Pho Filet in South El Monte.
Pho Filet
GastronomyBlog

Kim Hoa Hue Food To Go

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Every meal at this temple of Central Vietnamese fare should begin with the Hue combo, a sample platter of banh beo (steamed rice cakes topped with shrimp and cracklins), banh nam (rice cakes embedded with shrimp and steamed in banana leaves), and banh bot loc (shrimp and pork dumplings). Follow it up with the com hen — a bowl of steamed rice, baby clams, sesame seeds, and fresh herbs served with a light clam broth.

Kim Hoa Hue Food To Go
Kim Hoa Hue Food To Go
Gastronomy Blog

Thien Tam Vegetarian Restaurant

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The key to excellent Vietnamese vegetarian fare is a killer mock nuoc cham (fish sauce vinaigrette), and nobody makes it better than the folks at Thien Tam. Dig into platters of broken rice prettied with seasoned wheat gluten molded into various forms, as well as classic noodle soups that manage to satisfy without any animal byproducts.

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Vinh Loi Tofu

Owner and chef Kevin Tran makes fresh tofu each day for his savory and sweet vegan fare. The Iron Man pho satisfies, while the warm and sweet ginger tofu “pudding” comes through for dessert. Open for takeout and delivery in Reseda and Cerritos.

My Lai

Shad Davis and Traci Phan Davis’s fast-casual My Lai serves Vietnamese build-your-own bowls, light bites like spring rolls and fried tofu, and composed dishes inspired by family recipes including chicken with garlic rice. 

Pho Hue Oi

With locations in Little Saigon and Redondo Beach, Pho Hue Oi is a favorite of Eater’s editor Matthew Kang. He always orders the house-special pho and garlic shrimp noodles.

Pho Saigon Pearl

Pho Saigon Pearl is a haven for dependable Vietnamese dishes including spring rolls, banh mi sandwiches, soups, and noodle bowls. The restaurant is open daily from noon to 9 p.m. for dine-in, takeout, and delivery.

Bé Ù

A banh mi sandwich made on a baguette and filled with lemongrass beef, pickled vegetables, cucumber, and jalapeno.
A banh mi sandwich at Bé Ù in East Hollywood.
Wonho Frank Lee

Bé Ù serves Vietnamese comfort and street foods at affordable prices. The restaurant’s chef and owner Uyên Lê takes great pride in every dish on the menu, but is particularly fond of the banh mi. The sandwiches come stuffed with lemongrass-scented chicken, pork, and beef. Order Lê’s favorite vegan banh mi filled with tofu and pate. 

A banh mi sandwich made on a baguette and filled with lemongrass beef, pickled vegetables, cucumber, and jalapeno.
A banh mi sandwich at Bé Ù in East Hollywood.
Wonho Frank Lee

Viet Noodle Bar

Chef Viet Tran takes classic Vietnamese fare to hipper and healthier pastures at his Atwater Village restaurant. The young jackfruit salad makes for a satisfying meatless starter, while the turmeric white fish noodles with dill keep the crowds coming back time and again. Open for dine-in, takeout, and delivery.

Thien Huong Restaurant

Find Thien Huong Restaurant tucked into the ground floor of Far East Plaza in Chinatown. The extensive menu runs the gamut, but regulars can’t resist the pho ga (chicken noodle soup) and the bun bo Hue (Hue-style beef and lemongrass noodle soup).

Phở 87

LA’s historic Chinatown plays host to some of the city’s finest Vietnamese cooking. Phở 87’s winding menu includes dozens of iterations of Vietnam’s iconic beef noodle soup, but the one to order is the pho dac biet that includes a bit of every beefy cut like brisket, tendon, flank, and tripe.

Nem Nuong Khanh Hoa

Vietnamese meatballs (nem) are a curiously loud bunch that snap at first bite and squeak at first chew. Here, grilled pork meatballs and skewers are served on grand platters along with rice papers for wrapping and a forest of greens for garnishing.

Nha Trang Noodle House Restaurant

<span data-author="2715">Nha Trang Noodle House Restaurant </span>
Nha Trang Noodle House Restaurant
GastronomyBlog

The menu at Nha Trang is refreshingly pared down with only eight dishes to choose from. On the menu is pho and a few banh mi, but the specialty are noodle soups from central Vietnam. The bun bo Hue is one of the better versions to be had on this side of the Pacific.

<span data-author="2715">Nha Trang Noodle House Restaurant </span>
Nha Trang Noodle House Restaurant
GastronomyBlog

Golden Deli Vietnamese Restaurant

Broken rice from Golden Deli in San Gabriel.
Golden Deli Vietnamese Restaurant
Cathy Chaplin

Find southern-style Vietnamese food at this perpetually busy, efficiently run, and solid-as-can-be restaurant. Come for the blistered cha gio stuffed with ground pork and woodear mushrooms, and stay for a bowl of pho, a platter of broken rice, or cool vermicelli noodles.

Broken rice from Golden Deli in San Gabriel.
Golden Deli Vietnamese Restaurant
Cathy Chaplin

Com Tam Thuan Kieu Restaurant

Broken rice served with a plethora of proteins is what it’s all about at this long-standing restaurant. Toppings include shredded pork dusted in roasted rice powder, pork meatloaf, grilled shrimp paste, grilled pork, and more. Make sure to get a fried egg to top it all off.

Hien Khanh

Hien Khanh
Hien Khanh
GastronomyBlog

Hidden away in the food court of Rosemead’s Square Supermarket lies Hien Khanh, a Little Saigon import that makes the very best Vietnamese desserts in town. Those unfamiliar with the genre may be a bit wary upon seeing legumes, seaweed, and root vegetables swimming in a sea of coconut milk, but there’s no need to hesitate because everything tastes stupendous.

Hien Khanh
Hien Khanh
GastronomyBlog

Pho Ngoon

Pho Ngoon
Pho Ngoon
GastronomyBlog

The specialty here is Northern Vietnam’s greatest hits. The bun cha, the region’s quintessential dish, comes with charbroiled pork patties and pork belly soaking in fish sauce. An order of the nem cua be, beautifully blistered crab and pork egg rolls, is an absolute must.

Pho Ngoon
Pho Ngoon
GastronomyBlog

Pho Ga District

Bun mang vit, duck and bamboo noodle soup with herbs and sauce at Pho Ga
Pho Ga District
Wonho Frank Lee

It’s hard to find a bowl of chicken pho better than the ones made by Phan Tran at Pho Ga District. The bun mang vit, noodle soup with duck and bamboo shoots, is stellar as well.

Bun mang vit, duck and bamboo noodle soup with herbs and sauce at Pho Ga
Pho Ga District
Wonho Frank Lee

Related Maps

Sáu Can Tho Vietnamese Kitchen

Sáu Can Tho Vietnamese Kitchen
Sáu Can Tho Vietnamese Kitchen
GastronomyBlog

The signature dish at Sáu Can Tho is baked catfish (ca dut lo hau giang). The fish’s prized crispy skin, charred in some spots and golden throughout, gives way to moist and tender flesh imbued with honey and turmeric. Served on the side are herbs and lettuce, pickled carrots and daikon, cucumber spears, vermicelli rice noodles, rice papers, and best of all, a tangy-sweet tamarind dipping sauce. Call ahead to reserve the catfish to avoid a long wait.

Sáu Can Tho Vietnamese Kitchen
Sáu Can Tho Vietnamese Kitchen
GastronomyBlog

Banh Xeo Quan

Banh Xeo Quan
Banh Xeo Quan
@GastronomyBlog

Banh Xeo Quan, also known as Mr. Rice, specializes in Vietnamese crepes. Owner Phi Tran opened the restaurant to bring this southern Vietnamese specialty to the San Gabriel Valley. Banh xeo, which literally means “sizzling cake,” earned its name from the sound the batter makes when it hits the scorching pan. The result is a thin crepe that’s crisp and delicate throughout with lacy, caramelized edges. Stuffed inside bean sprouts, mushrooms, shrimp, and pork. Go ahead and upgrade to the banh xeo dac biet for extra filling.

Banh Xeo Quan
Banh Xeo Quan
@GastronomyBlog

Pho Filet

A steaming bowl of beef pho at Pho Filet in South El Monte.
Pho Filet
GastronomyBlog

Linh Phuong Nguyen makes one of the city’s best bowls of southern-style pho at this worn-in restaurant straddling the border between Rosemead and South El Monte. While the filet mignon that comes standard with every bowl is a cut above the rest, it’s Nguyen’s unparalleled broth that distinguishes her product from the dozens of pho hawkers in town.

A steaming bowl of beef pho at Pho Filet in South El Monte.
Pho Filet
GastronomyBlog

Kim Hoa Hue Food To Go

Kim Hoa Hue Food To Go
Kim Hoa Hue Food To Go
Gastronomy Blog

Every meal at this temple of Central Vietnamese fare should begin with the Hue combo, a sample platter of banh beo (steamed rice cakes topped with shrimp and cracklins), banh nam (rice cakes embedded with shrimp and steamed in banana leaves), and banh bot loc (shrimp and pork dumplings). Follow it up with the com hen — a bowl of steamed rice, baby clams, sesame seeds, and fresh herbs served with a light clam broth.

Kim Hoa Hue Food To Go
Kim Hoa Hue Food To Go
Gastronomy Blog

Thien Tam Vegetarian Restaurant

The key to excellent Vietnamese vegetarian fare is a killer mock nuoc cham (fish sauce vinaigrette), and nobody makes it better than the folks at Thien Tam. Dig into platters of broken rice prettied with seasoned wheat gluten molded into various forms, as well as classic noodle soups that manage to satisfy without any animal byproducts.

Related Maps