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Rich marbled tuna sushi on a slate.
O-toro from Sushi Note.
Matthew Kang

19 Essential Los Angeles Sushi Restaurants, 2022 Edition

Where to indulge in the most pristine nigiri and sashimi

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O-toro from Sushi Note.
| Matthew Kang

Los Angeles has a plethora of culinary strong suits, like regional Chinese fare and tacos of all stripes, but almost none are as impressive than the city’s robust sushi offerings. Unfortunately, the pandemic was especially challenging for those same sushi restaurants, many of which rely on the intimate interaction of chefs with customers at the counter. Despite these challenges, LA’s sushi scene today is returning to full strength, with upscale omakase menus and enduring mom-and-pop classics in the South Bay. From world-class nigiri to out-of-the-box experimentation, here are 19 of Los Angeles’s essential sushi restaurants.

Added: Kogane, Kisen, Kiriko

Removed: Sushi Iki, Matsumoto, Kumiko, Inaba Manhattan Beach, Yasu

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The Brothers Sushi

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The Valley is no stranger to good sushi, and Brother’s is a fine addition to the thriving scene. Order a la carte or sit back and let the chef Mark Okuda take care of the meal with an omakase. The priciest menu is $200 and comes with a more creative approach to omakase, though a more attainable $140 menu offers much of the same stellar sushi.

Sushi on a slate plate.
Sushi from Brothers Sushi in Woodland Hills.
Matthew Kang

Shin Sushi

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Shin Sushi brings a refined omakase experience worthy of a Michelin star from Taketoshi Azumi (whom patrons refer to as Take-san) with a high-end array of amazing nigiri and more all priced around $200 per person for dinner.

Shin Sushi
Shin Sushi
Shin Sushi [Official Photo]

Sushi|Bar

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Phillip Frankland Lee took an unconventional route to opening a high-end omakase counter hidden away behind Scratch|Bar. A longtime fan of sushi restaurants in LA and the San Fernando Valley, Lee took his love of great sushi and decided to create his own style. Traditionalists would balk at Lee’s undertaking, but the fans continue to show up in droves. Prices for a meal here start at $145, which could be considered a very fair price these days.

Seared yellowtail nigiri at Sushi|Bar
Matthew Kang

Sushi Kiriko

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Reliable, reasonably priced, and always a great time, Kiriko remains the Westside’s enduring all-around sushi restaurant with approachable lunch menus and counter sushi offerings for dinner that would rival some of the best places in town. Omakase costs upwards of $200 for the premium cuts.

Masakazu

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With a full omakase dinner and a sushi-only option, this somewhat under-the-radar restaurant along Westwood Boulevard from chef Shinichi Akazawa is one of the best upscale sushi spot in West LA.

Sushi Note

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One of the Valley’s best new sushi entrants, Sushi Note takes the mastery of chef Kiminobu Saito’s excellent omakase and combines it with a fantastic wine pairing menu. Throw in a rather nice midcentury modern space and it adds up to a very good reasonably priced sushi experience with pristine fish, moderately seasoned rice, and great service.

Rich marbled tuna sushi on a slate.
O-toro nigiri from Sushi Note.
Matthew Kang

Nozawa Bar

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The spirit of Nozawa lives on at this intimate sushi bar located behind the Sugarfish in Beverly Hills. With fewer than ten seats, this rarified experience feels very much like a top-level place in Tokyo, with theatrical service and a hushed counter dining experience. The $225 per person meal comes with twenty-some courses.

Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter.
Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter
Matthew Kang

Sushi Chitose

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Priced at just $65 per person, the omakase from Hirofumi Sakamoto offers one of the best deals in town. Settle in to 15 pieces of terrific sushi that is sure to impress even the snobbiest of sushi-goers. The varieties of fish range from familiar cuts to more obscure ones.

Sushi Tama

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Sushi Tama opened in August 2020 in a chic part of West Hollywood/Beverly Grove, with a sleek counter and fresh nigiri with fish sourced from Japan. Chef Hideyuki Yoshimoto worked for years in Tokyo’s Tsukiji Market before partnering with Showa Hospitality at this stylish sushi destination.

A collection of fresh sushi and nigiri in a simple box.
Sushi Tama
Matthew Kang

Sushi Park

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A purist sushi destination located in a most unlikely West Hollywood strip mall. Head here for the blue crab hand roll, unagi, toro, and uni — and don’t be surprised if you see an in-the-know celebrity dining across the way. If price is no option, Sushi Park is certainly one of the top places in West Hollywood.

Fukuno Restaurant

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This casual mom-and-pop restaurant has been serving approachably priced Kappo-style fare in a Gardena strip mall since 1994. Mitsuo Fukazawa and his wife serve bento and pressed oshi sushi that reflects the more traditional, slightly fermented style that preceded Edo-style nigiri that is more common around town. There’s also terrific chirashi too. The restaurant offers takeout only for lunch, with indoor dining for dinner.

Morihiro

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Sushi chef Morihiro Onodera founded the celebrated Mori in West LA before helming the counters at Inn Ann and Shiki over the past few years. Onodera has finally opened his own high-end omakase restaurant in Atwater Village, with masterful preparations and stunning world-class sushi. The price to see Onodera in action is equally sky-high.

Japanese bowls hold fine foods during daylight hours atop a wooden table.
Morihiro
Morihiro

The quality of the fish speaks for itself at this refined sushi den in the heart of Downtown’s Financial District. While dinner will cost a pretty penny, lunch might be a worthy splurge for those working in the area. Dinner omakase is $300, with lunch at $150 a person.

Oyster from Q Sushi
Q Sushi
Cathy Chaplin

This popular West LA spot gets a second location in the heart of Downtown’s Historic Core where Keizo Seki serves his ultra-fresh sushi from an omakase-style counter. In the past few years, Zo has expanded to Bangkok, Tokyo, and Hong Kong, a testament to the stellar quality of the meals here. Reservations are required and prices run above $200 a person.

Sushi Takeda

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With two levels of omakase, from $110 at lunch to $280 for dinner (with a nigiri-only menu for $140), this newer high-end omakase restaurant comes into Little Tokyo, joining another new player in Kaneyoshi. Sourcing fish from California and Toyosu Market in Tokyo, chef Hide Takeda’s intimate omakase experience is already one of the most talked about sushi dinners in town.

Sushi Kaneyoshi

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One of the newer stars in LA’s high-end sushi scene, Kaneyoshi marks a new era for Little Tokyo, which earned this upscale, counter-only restaurant that costs a hefty $300 a person (though some more affordable takeout nigiri options are also available). Expect nothing but a truly spectacular sushi dinner comparable to the best around the world.

Jewelrybox chirashi from Kaneyoshi
Jewelrybox chirashi from Kaneyoshi
Kaneyoshi

Sushi Gen

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This iconic sushi restaurant in Little Tokyo is constantly packed at the bar and in the dining room. Most come for the unbelievably priced lunch sashimi special, but order directly from the menu or at the bar for an even better experience. The expansive selection of nigiri sushi and sashimi is sure to satisfy.

Chefs Fumio Azumi and Kwan-san have brought a phenomenal destination-worthy sushi place to Alhambra, with a hefty $250 per person menu served at the bar at dinner and a more reasonable $100 lunch on week days. Quality is top-tier, with two kinds of rice and all the freshest fish available. The two would know their fish, as they met during the pandemic while working together in the refrigerated room of a seafood wholesaler in Downtown.

Fumio Azumi and Kwan-san at Kogane restaurant in Alhambra, California.
Fumio Azumi and Kwan-san at Kogane.
Matthew Kang

Sushi Kisen

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This unassuming sushi spot in Arcadia has a versatile lunch sushi set from chef Hiro Yamada (Sushi Gen, Shiki) with stellar quality and pristine seafood. The lunch set is $33 or so and comes with nine pieces of nigiri, a cut roll, miso soup, and a few small bites. Dinner has more elaborate edomae-style omakase, though basic dinners start around $50 a person for food exclusive of drinks.

For edomae-style sushi without leaving the San Gabriel Valley: Kisen Sushi.
Sushi at Kisen in Arcadia.
Cathy Chaplin

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The Brothers Sushi

Sushi on a slate plate.
Sushi from Brothers Sushi in Woodland Hills.
Matthew Kang

The Valley is no stranger to good sushi, and Brother’s is a fine addition to the thriving scene. Order a la carte or sit back and let the chef Mark Okuda take care of the meal with an omakase. The priciest menu is $200 and comes with a more creative approach to omakase, though a more attainable $140 menu offers much of the same stellar sushi.

Sushi on a slate plate.
Sushi from Brothers Sushi in Woodland Hills.
Matthew Kang

Shin Sushi

Shin Sushi
Shin Sushi
Shin Sushi [Official Photo]

Shin Sushi brings a refined omakase experience worthy of a Michelin star from Taketoshi Azumi (whom patrons refer to as Take-san) with a high-end array of amazing nigiri and more all priced around $200 per person for dinner.

Shin Sushi
Shin Sushi
Shin Sushi [Official Photo]

Sushi|Bar

Seared yellowtail nigiri at Sushi|Bar
Matthew Kang

Phillip Frankland Lee took an unconventional route to opening a high-end omakase counter hidden away behind Scratch|Bar. A longtime fan of sushi restaurants in LA and the San Fernando Valley, Lee took his love of great sushi and decided to create his own style. Traditionalists would balk at Lee’s undertaking, but the fans continue to show up in droves. Prices for a meal here start at $145, which could be considered a very fair price these days.

Seared yellowtail nigiri at Sushi|Bar
Matthew Kang

Sushi Kiriko

Reliable, reasonably priced, and always a great time, Kiriko remains the Westside’s enduring all-around sushi restaurant with approachable lunch menus and counter sushi offerings for dinner that would rival some of the best places in town. Omakase costs upwards of $200 for the premium cuts.

Masakazu

With a full omakase dinner and a sushi-only option, this somewhat under-the-radar restaurant along Westwood Boulevard from chef Shinichi Akazawa is one of the best upscale sushi spot in West LA.

Sushi Note

Rich marbled tuna sushi on a slate.
O-toro nigiri from Sushi Note.
Matthew Kang

One of the Valley’s best new sushi entrants, Sushi Note takes the mastery of chef Kiminobu Saito’s excellent omakase and combines it with a fantastic wine pairing menu. Throw in a rather nice midcentury modern space and it adds up to a very good reasonably priced sushi experience with pristine fish, moderately seasoned rice, and great service.

Rich marbled tuna sushi on a slate.
O-toro nigiri from Sushi Note.
Matthew Kang

Nozawa Bar

Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter.
Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter
Matthew Kang

The spirit of Nozawa lives on at this intimate sushi bar located behind the Sugarfish in Beverly Hills. With fewer than ten seats, this rarified experience feels very much like a top-level place in Tokyo, with theatrical service and a hushed counter dining experience. The $225 per person meal comes with twenty-some courses.

Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter.
Chef Osamu Fujita of Nozawa Bar working with other chefs at the counter
Matthew Kang

Sushi Chitose

Priced at just $65 per person, the omakase from Hirofumi Sakamoto offers one of the best deals in town. Settle in to 15 pieces of terrific sushi that is sure to impress even the snobbiest of sushi-goers. The varieties of fish range from familiar cuts to more obscure ones.

Sushi Tama

A collection of fresh sushi and nigiri in a simple box.
Sushi Tama
Matthew Kang

Sushi Tama opened in August 2020 in a chic part of West Hollywood/Beverly Grove, with a sleek counter and fresh nigiri with fish sourced from Japan. Chef Hideyuki Yoshimoto worked for years in Tokyo’s Tsukiji Market before partnering with Showa Hospitality at this stylish sushi destination.

A collection of fresh sushi and nigiri in a simple box.
Sushi Tama
Matthew Kang

Sushi Park

A purist sushi destination located in a most unlikely West Hollywood strip mall. Head here for the blue crab hand roll, unagi, toro, and uni — and don’t be surprised if you see an in-the-know celebrity dining across the way. If price is no option, Sushi Park is certainly one of the top places in West Hollywood.

Fukuno Restaurant

This casual mom-and-pop restaurant has been serving approachably priced Kappo-style fare in a Gardena strip mall since 1994. Mitsuo Fukazawa and his wife serve bento and pressed oshi sushi that reflects the more traditional, slightly fermented style that preceded Edo-style nigiri that is more common around town. There’s also terrific chirashi too. The restaurant offers takeout only for lunch, with indoor dining for dinner.

Morihiro

Japanese bowls hold fine foods during daylight hours atop a wooden table.
Morihiro
Morihiro

Sushi chef Morihiro Onodera founded the celebrated Mori in West LA before helming the counters at Inn Ann and Shiki over the past few years. Onodera has finally opened his own high-end omakase restaurant in Atwater Village, with masterful preparations and stunning world-class sushi. The price to see Onodera in action is equally sky-high.

Japanese bowls hold fine foods during daylight hours atop a wooden table.
Morihiro
Morihiro

Q

Oyster from Q Sushi
Q Sushi
Cathy Chaplin

The quality of the fish speaks for itself at this refined sushi den in the heart of Downtown’s Financial District. While dinner will cost a pretty penny, lunch might be a worthy splurge for those working in the area. Dinner omakase is $300, with lunch at $150 a person.

Oyster from Q Sushi
Q Sushi
Cathy Chaplin

Zo

This popular West LA spot gets a second location in the heart of Downtown’s Historic Core where Keizo Seki serves his ultra-fresh sushi from an omakase-style counter. In the past few years, Zo has expanded to Bangkok, Tokyo, and Hong Kong, a testament to the stellar quality of the meals here. Reservations are required and prices run above $200 a person.

Sushi Takeda

With two levels of omakase, from $110 at lunch to $280 for dinner (with a nigiri-only menu for $140), this newer high-end omakase restaurant comes into Little Tokyo, joining another new player in Kaneyoshi. Sourcing fish from California and Toyosu Market in Tokyo, chef Hide Takeda’s intimate omakase experience is already one of the most talked about sushi dinners in town.

Related Maps

Sushi Kaneyoshi

Jewelrybox chirashi from Kaneyoshi
Jewelrybox chirashi from Kaneyoshi
Kaneyoshi

One of the newer stars in LA’s high-end sushi scene, Kaneyoshi marks a new era for Little Tokyo, which earned this upscale, counter-only restaurant that costs a hefty $300 a person (though some more affordable takeout nigiri options are also available). Expect nothing but a truly spectacular sushi dinner comparable to the best around the world.

Jewelrybox chirashi from Kaneyoshi
Jewelrybox chirashi from Kaneyoshi
Kaneyoshi

Sushi Gen

This iconic sushi restaurant in Little Tokyo is constantly packed at the bar and in the dining room. Most come for the unbelievably priced lunch sashimi special, but order directly from the menu or at the bar for an even better experience. The expansive selection of nigiri sushi and sashimi is sure to satisfy.

Kogane

Fumio Azumi and Kwan-san at Kogane restaurant in Alhambra, California.
Fumio Azumi and Kwan-san at Kogane.
Matthew Kang

Chefs Fumio Azumi and Kwan-san have brought a phenomenal destination-worthy sushi place to Alhambra, with a hefty $250 per person menu served at the bar at dinner and a more reasonable $100 lunch on week days. Quality is top-tier, with two kinds of rice and all the freshest fish available. The two would know their fish, as they met during the pandemic while working together in the refrigerated room of a seafood wholesaler in Downtown.

Fumio Azumi and Kwan-san at Kogane restaurant in Alhambra, California.
Fumio Azumi and Kwan-san at Kogane.
Matthew Kang

Sushi Kisen

For edomae-style sushi without leaving the San Gabriel Valley: Kisen Sushi.
Sushi at Kisen in Arcadia.
Cathy Chaplin

This unassuming sushi spot in Arcadia has a versatile lunch sushi set from chef Hiro Yamada (Sushi Gen, Shiki) with stellar quality and pristine seafood. The lunch set is $33 or so and comes with nine pieces of nigiri, a cut roll, miso soup, and a few small bites. Dinner has more elaborate edomae-style omakase, though basic dinners start around $50 a person for food exclusive of drinks.

For edomae-style sushi without leaving the San Gabriel Valley: Kisen Sushi.
Sushi at Kisen in Arcadia.
Cathy Chaplin

Related Maps