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Shabu-shabu spread from Mizu 212 in Sawtelle.
Shabu-shabu from Mizu 212 in Sawtelle Japantown.
Mizu 212

12 Soulful Shabu-Shabu Restaurants in Los Angeles

Swish through Japanese hotpot paradise

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Shabu-shabu from Mizu 212 in Sawtelle Japantown.
| Mizu 212

Shabu-shabu, which means “swish-swish,” begins with raw meat, seafood, and vegetables dipped into boiling broth before being further dipped into a punchy sauce of ponzu or goma (sesame).

Japanese hot pot has been tearing across LA in recent years. From Koreatown’s all-you-can-eat scene to the old school spots swishing away in the South Bay and Little Tokyo and the high-end joints that wouldn’t be out of place in Japan. Here now are the 13 essential shabu-shabu restaurants in Los Angeles.

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Mizu 212

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A fun everyday shabu-shabu spot in Sawtelle Japantown, Mizu 212 continues to serve solid cuts of prime grade and wagyu beef to the neighborhood. Diners can opt for two kinds of broth, including spicy Sichuan and mushroom, in addition to a basic water bath, where meats, vegetables, and noodles get a plunge. Dinner comes in around $45 a person before tax and tip, while lunch offers an all-you-can-eat menu.

Shabu-shabu spread from Mizu 212 in Sawtelle.
Shabu-shabu spread from Mizu 212 in Sawtelle.
Mizu 212

This staid, minimalist space in Beverly Hills feels plucked out of a pricey district in Tokyo serving some of the city’s most expensive wagyu beef sukiyaki and shabu-shabu. Meals start at $150 per person and go up to $190, and start with beef tongue followed by three or four types of Yazawa wagyu. A splurge worth taking for real shabu-shabu aficionados.

Sliced wagyu beef at Ima in Beverly Hills.
Sliced wagyu beef from Ima in Beverly Hills.
Matthew Kang

Mo-Mo-Paradise

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This newer shabu shabu house in South Bay offers a unique AYCE setup. Start with a traditional, sukiyaki, kimchi, or even tonkotsu soup base, then offers all the meat, seafood, and veggies for just under $35 a person for dinner, and even cheaper for lunch. The only catch is that diners have to finish their meals within 90 minutes. Considering there’s virtually no waiting time for food once the table is seated, this usually isn’t hard to do. During lunch, there’s a meat plate limit of two per person, though the buffet is still unlimited.

Shin-Sen-Gumi Shabu-Shabu

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One of LA’s more elder statesman shabu-shabu houses, this small restaurant in Gardena prepares some of the most elemental Japanese hotpot in town. There’s a variety of premium meats while insiders know to order some rice at the end to make a delicious porridge from the remaining broth. This is purist shabu-shabu at its finest. The menu is now all-you-can-eat in the evenings, making it all the more enjoyable.

Bon Shabu

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Newly located at the ground floor of a Wilshire Boulevard office tower, Bon Shabu continues its tradition of all-you-can-eat shabu-shabu but introduces a huge buffet area where patrons can load up on vegetables, sauces, and appetizers before returning to the table for a huge variety of meats, including wagyu, chicken, and pork options. Patrons can pick between a slew of broths like spicy huo guo or traditional konbu. The high-ceiling space recalls a sleek Seoul restaurant, which makes sense given its Koreatown location.

Dining room with tables and booths at Bon Shabu.
Bon Shabu in Downtown LA.
Bon Shabu

Shabuya Los Angeles

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Truly one of the busiest shabu shabu restaurants in the city, this all-you-can-eat extragavanza costs a modest price and offers a slew of meats from thinly sliced wagyu and short rib to pork belly and even jidori chicken. Choose between a number of broths, from basic dashi or slightly sweetened sukiyaki to an intense, spicy Chinese-style “huo guo.” The best part is the huge buffet bar that allows diners to load up on veggies, sauces, and even seafood. Expect to wait during prime dining hours.

Meat selections at Shabuya
Matthew Kang

Lucky Mizu

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Potentially the city’s splashiest new shabu-shabu restaurant in years, Lucky Mizu comes to the bustling Level 8 in Downtown from chef Hisae Stuck, who trained with Joël Robuchon. The results are a semi-hidden dining room serving high-end shabu-shabu with prime-grade American beef, wagyu, and pristine vegetables. The menu offers some raw fish options as well, and even sushi, in case shabu-shabu feels too daunting.

A wooden table with floral print booth seats showing golden platters for hot pot dinner at LA restaurant Lucky Mizu.
Dishes from Lucky Mizu in Downtown LA.
Andrea D’Agosto

Joon Shabu Shabu

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With individual hotpots and reasonable serving prices between $25 to 33 for dinner, Joon is a viable alternative in a sleek space in Glendale. They’ve even got seafood, chicken, and vegetarian shabu-shabu servings for anyone looking to have something other than beef.

The former Kagaya in Little Tokyo was considered the zenith of shabu-shabu in Los Angeles, serving only the best quality American prime-grade beef and Japanese wagyu in gorgeous slices. With a chef and owner change over the past few years, the new establishment is called Tensho, though the commitment to elegant, high-end shabu-shabu hasn’t changed. The best move would be to order the top-level $188 seafood and wagyu combination and just enjoy the ride.

Shabu-shabu, seafood, and broth from Tensho in Little Tokyo.
Shabu-shabu, seafood, and broth from Tensho in Little Tokyo.
Tensho

Though Osawa has an expansive menu of sushi and other Japanese fare, the shabu-shabu is one of the best reasons to belly up the counter at this Pasadena restaurant. Prices are fairly high, with ribeye servings starting in the low $30s and going all the way up to an $110 portion of Japanese wagyu.

California Hot Pot

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The crowd here knows how to swish-swish and most opt for the most “premium” proteins because life’s too short for mystery meat. Choose from eight preset hot pot offerings, like the Malibu with pork belly and beef tenderloin or the Keto-friendly Hollywood Protein with baby spinach, lamb shoulder, and prime beef. An array of sauces, including sesame, garlic, ponzu, and black bean, are located next to the cash register.

California Hot Pot
California Hot Pot
Julie P./Yelp

Oseyo Shabu Shabu

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Located on a quieter stretch of Colorado, Oseyo attracts a mostly local crowd with a smattering of Caltech and PCC students. Grab a seat in the sleek dining room and cozy up to four different kinds of broth (kobu seaweed, spicy miso, sukiyaki, or tomato) and twice as many protein combinations. Australian lamb is a standout, as is the “Yongenton silky pork” imported from Japan.

Oseyo Shabu Shabu
Oseyo Shabu Shabu
Dean C./Yelp

Mizu 212

A fun everyday shabu-shabu spot in Sawtelle Japantown, Mizu 212 continues to serve solid cuts of prime grade and wagyu beef to the neighborhood. Diners can opt for two kinds of broth, including spicy Sichuan and mushroom, in addition to a basic water bath, where meats, vegetables, and noodles get a plunge. Dinner comes in around $45 a person before tax and tip, while lunch offers an all-you-can-eat menu.

Shabu-shabu spread from Mizu 212 in Sawtelle.
Shabu-shabu spread from Mizu 212 in Sawtelle.
Mizu 212

IMA

This staid, minimalist space in Beverly Hills feels plucked out of a pricey district in Tokyo serving some of the city’s most expensive wagyu beef sukiyaki and shabu-shabu. Meals start at $150 per person and go up to $190, and start with beef tongue followed by three or four types of Yazawa wagyu. A splurge worth taking for real shabu-shabu aficionados.

Sliced wagyu beef at Ima in Beverly Hills.
Sliced wagyu beef from Ima in Beverly Hills.
Matthew Kang

Mo-Mo-Paradise

This newer shabu shabu house in South Bay offers a unique AYCE setup. Start with a traditional, sukiyaki, kimchi, or even tonkotsu soup base, then offers all the meat, seafood, and veggies for just under $35 a person for dinner, and even cheaper for lunch. The only catch is that diners have to finish their meals within 90 minutes. Considering there’s virtually no waiting time for food once the table is seated, this usually isn’t hard to do. During lunch, there’s a meat plate limit of two per person, though the buffet is still unlimited.

Shin-Sen-Gumi Shabu-Shabu

One of LA’s more elder statesman shabu-shabu houses, this small restaurant in Gardena prepares some of the most elemental Japanese hotpot in town. There’s a variety of premium meats while insiders know to order some rice at the end to make a delicious porridge from the remaining broth. This is purist shabu-shabu at its finest. The menu is now all-you-can-eat in the evenings, making it all the more enjoyable.

Bon Shabu

Newly located at the ground floor of a Wilshire Boulevard office tower, Bon Shabu continues its tradition of all-you-can-eat shabu-shabu but introduces a huge buffet area where patrons can load up on vegetables, sauces, and appetizers before returning to the table for a huge variety of meats, including wagyu, chicken, and pork options. Patrons can pick between a slew of broths like spicy huo guo or traditional konbu. The high-ceiling space recalls a sleek Seoul restaurant, which makes sense given its Koreatown location.

Dining room with tables and booths at Bon Shabu.
Bon Shabu in Downtown LA.
Bon Shabu

Shabuya Los Angeles

Truly one of the busiest shabu shabu restaurants in the city, this all-you-can-eat extragavanza costs a modest price and offers a slew of meats from thinly sliced wagyu and short rib to pork belly and even jidori chicken. Choose between a number of broths, from basic dashi or slightly sweetened sukiyaki to an intense, spicy Chinese-style “huo guo.” The best part is the huge buffet bar that allows diners to load up on veggies, sauces, and even seafood. Expect to wait during prime dining hours.

Meat selections at Shabuya
Matthew Kang

Lucky Mizu

Potentially the city’s splashiest new shabu-shabu restaurant in years, Lucky Mizu comes to the bustling Level 8 in Downtown from chef Hisae Stuck, who trained with Joël Robuchon. The results are a semi-hidden dining room serving high-end shabu-shabu with prime-grade American beef, wagyu, and pristine vegetables. The menu offers some raw fish options as well, and even sushi, in case shabu-shabu feels too daunting.

A wooden table with floral print booth seats showing golden platters for hot pot dinner at LA restaurant Lucky Mizu.
Dishes from Lucky Mizu in Downtown LA.
Andrea D’Agosto

Joon Shabu Shabu

With individual hotpots and reasonable serving prices between $25 to 33 for dinner, Joon is a viable alternative in a sleek space in Glendale. They’ve even got seafood, chicken, and vegetarian shabu-shabu servings for anyone looking to have something other than beef.

Tensho

The former Kagaya in Little Tokyo was considered the zenith of shabu-shabu in Los Angeles, serving only the best quality American prime-grade beef and Japanese wagyu in gorgeous slices. With a chef and owner change over the past few years, the new establishment is called Tensho, though the commitment to elegant, high-end shabu-shabu hasn’t changed. The best move would be to order the top-level $188 seafood and wagyu combination and just enjoy the ride.

Shabu-shabu, seafood, and broth from Tensho in Little Tokyo.
Shabu-shabu, seafood, and broth from Tensho in Little Tokyo.
Tensho

Osawa

Though Osawa has an expansive menu of sushi and other Japanese fare, the shabu-shabu is one of the best reasons to belly up the counter at this Pasadena restaurant. Prices are fairly high, with ribeye servings starting in the low $30s and going all the way up to an $110 portion of Japanese wagyu.

California Hot Pot

The crowd here knows how to swish-swish and most opt for the most “premium” proteins because life’s too short for mystery meat. Choose from eight preset hot pot offerings, like the Malibu with pork belly and beef tenderloin or the Keto-friendly Hollywood Protein with baby spinach, lamb shoulder, and prime beef. An array of sauces, including sesame, garlic, ponzu, and black bean, are located next to the cash register.

California Hot Pot
California Hot Pot
Julie P./Yelp

Oseyo Shabu Shabu

Located on a quieter stretch of Colorado, Oseyo attracts a mostly local crowd with a smattering of Caltech and PCC students. Grab a seat in the sleek dining room and cozy up to four different kinds of broth (kobu seaweed, spicy miso, sukiyaki, or tomato) and twice as many protein combinations. Australian lamb is a standout, as is the “Yongenton silky pork” imported from Japan.

Oseyo Shabu Shabu
Oseyo Shabu Shabu
Dean C./Yelp

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